California Regulatory Notice Register No. 42z-2016, Published October 14, 2016

OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., GOVERNOR
REGISTER 2016, NO. 42-Z PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW OCTOBER 14, 2016

PROPOSED ACTION ON REGULATIONS

TITLE 2. FAIR POLITICAL PRACTICES COMMISSION
Conflict-of-Interest Code — Notice File No. Z2016-1004-02 …………………………………. 1837

Amendment
Multi-County: Independent Cities Finance Authority
Kings River Conservation District

Desert Community College District

TITLE 2. FAIR POLITICAL PRACTICES COMMISSION
Cost of Living Adjustment — Notice File No. Z2016-1004-03 …………………………………. 1838

TITLE 2. PUBLIC EMPLOYEES’ RETIREMENT SYSTEM
Public Comment — Notice File No. Z2016-1004-04 ………………………………………… 1840

TITLE 15. DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS AND REHABILITATION
Urinalysis Testing— Notice File No. Z2016-1004-05 ……………………………………….. 1843

TITLE 16. CALIFORNIA ARCHITECTS BOARD/LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS TECHNICAL
COMMITTEE
Fees — Notice File No. Z2016-1004-09 ………………………………………………… 1845

TITLE 27. OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Proposition 65 Safe Use Determination Hearings — Notice File No. Z2016-1004-08 …………………. 1848

GENERAL PUBLIC INTEREST

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Proposed Changes to 1915(i) Program ………………………………………………….. 1851

PROPOSITION 65

OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Proposition 65 Listing Notice — Furfuryl Alcohol ………………………………………….. 1852

(Continued on next page)

Time-
Dated
Material
OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Proposition 65 Updated Chemical List — September 30, 2016 …………………………………. 1853

OAL REGULATORY DETERMINATION

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS AND REHABILITATION
2016 OAL DETERMINATION NO. 4(S) — SUMMARY DISPOSITION
California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Folsom State Prison Department of Operations
Manual (DOM) Supplement, Section 101040.50, titled “Recreational Activities” …………………….. 1874

RULEMAKING PETITION DECISION

BOARD OF PAROLE HEARINGS
Notice of Decision on Petition from William Vogel Concerning Term Calculations …………………… 1875

SUMMARY OF REGULATORY ACTIONS

Regulations filed with the Secretary of State ……………………………………………….. 1878
Sections Filed, May 4, 2016 to October 5, 2016 …………………………………………….. 1881
The California Regulatory Notice Register is an official state publication of the Office of Administrative Law containing
notices of proposed regulatory actions by state regulatory agencies to adopt, amend or repeal regulations contained in the
California Code of Regulations. The effective period of a notice of proposed regulatory action by a state agency in the
California Regulatory Notice Register shall not exceed one year [Government Code § 11346.4(b)]. It is suggested, therefore,
that issues of the California Regulatory Notice Register be retained for a minimum of 18 months.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z

PROPOSED ACTION ON
REGULATIONS
Information contained in this document is
published as received from agencies and is
not edited by Thomson Reuters.

TITLE 2. FAIR POLITICAL
PRACTICES COMMISSION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Fair Political
Practices Commission, pursuant to the authority vested
in it by Sections 82011, 87303, and 87304 of the Government
Code to review proposed conflict-of-interest
codes, will review the proposed/amended conflict-of-
interest codes of the following:

CONFLICT-OF-INTEREST CODES

AMENDMENT

MULTI-COUNTY: Independent Cities

Finance Authority

Kings River Conservation

District

Desert Community College

District

A written comment period has been established commencing
on October 14, 2016, and closing on November
28, 2016. Written comments should be directed to
the Fair Political Practices Commission, Attention Ivy
Branaman, 428 J Street, Suite 620, Sacramento, California
95814.

At the end of the 45-day comment period, the proposed
conflict-of-interest code(s) will be submitted to
the Commission’s Executive Director for her review,
unless any interested person or his or her duly authorized
representative requests, no later than 15 days prior
to the close of the written comment period, a public
hearing before the full Commission. If a public hearing
is requested, the proposed code(s) will be submitted to
the Commission for review.

The Executive Director of the Commission will review
the above-referenced conflict-of-interest
code(s), proposed pursuant to Government Code Section
87300, which designate, pursuant to Government
Code Section 87302, employees who must disclose certain
investments, interests in real property and income.

The Executive Director of the Commission, upon her
or its own motion or at the request of any interested per
son, will approve, or revise and approve, or return the
proposed code(s) to the agency for revision and re-
submission within 60 days without further notice.

Any interested person may present statements, arguments
or comments, in writing to the Executive Director
of the Commission, relative to review of the proposed
conflict-of-interest code(s). Any written comments
must be received no later than November 28,
2016. If a public hearing is to be held, oral comments
may be presented to the Commission at the hearing.

COST TO LOCAL AGENCIES

There shall be no reimbursement for any new or increased
costs to local government which may result
from compliance with these codes because these are not
new programs mandated on local agencies by the codes
since the requirements described herein were mandated
by the Political Reform Act of 1974. Therefore, they are
not “costs mandated by the state” as defined in Government
Code Section 17514.

EFFECT ON HOUSING COSTS
AND BUSINESSES
Compliance with the codes has no potential effect on
housing costs or on private persons, businesses or small
businesses.

AUTHORITY

Government Code Sections 82011, 87303 and 87304
provide that the Fair Political Practices Commission as
the code-reviewing body for the above conflict-of-
interest codes shall approve codes as submitted, revise
the proposed code and approve it as revised, or return
the proposed code for revision and re-submission.

REFERENCE

Government Code Sections 87300 and 87306 provide
that agencies shall adopt and promulgate conflict-
of-interest codes pursuant to the Political Reform Act
and amend their codes when change is necessitated by
changed circumstances.

CONTACT

Any inquiries concerning the proposed conflict-of-
interest code(s) should be made to Ivy Branaman, Fair
Political Practices Commission, 428 J Street, Suite 620,
Sacramento, California 95814, telephone (916)
322-5660.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
AVAILABILITY OF PROPOSED
CONFLICT-OF-INTEREST CODES
Copies of the proposed conflict-of-interest codes
may be obtained from the Commission offices or the respective
agency. Requests for copies from the Commission
should be made to Ivy Branaman, Fair Political
Practices Commission, 428 J Street, Suite 620, Sacramento,
California 95814, telephone (916) 322-5660.

TITLE 2. FAIR POLITICAL
PRACTICES COMMISSION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Fair Political
Practices Commission (the “Commission”), under the
authority vested in it under the Political Reform Act
(the “Act”)1 by Section 83112 of the Government Code,
proposes to adopt, amend, or repeal regulations in Title
2, Division 6 of the California Code of Regulations. The
Commission will consider the proposed regulation at a
public hearing on or after November 17, 2016, at the offices
of the Fair Political Practices Commission, 428 J
Street, Suite 800, Sacramento, California, commencing
at approximately 10:00 a.m. Written comments must
be received at the Commission offices no later than 5:00

p.m. on November 15, 2016.
BACKGROUND/OVERVIEW

(1) Biennial Cost of Living Adjustment for Campaign
Contribution Limits, Voluntary Expenditure Ceilings,
and State Officeholder Contribution Limits: Adoption
of Amendments to Regulations 18544 and 18545

Regulation 18545 sets forth current year contribution,
voluntary expenditure and state officeholder account
limits. Sections 83124, 85316(b), and 89503(f) of
the Act charge the Commission with making a cost of
living adjustment to the limit amounts biennially to reflect
changes in the Consumer Price Index (“CPI”). The
California Department of Finance (“DOF”) provides
the forecast and actual annual California CPI for All Urban
Consumers, based upon U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(Section 82001, Regulation 18544(c).)

This amendment makes the cost of living adjustments
for the period from January 1, 2017 through December
31, 2018. The adjustments are based on the California
CPI for the “calendar year immediately preceding the
year in which the adjustment is to take effect,” which is
2016. (Regulation 18544(c).) The DOF Consumer
Price Index Forecast, May Revise (dated April 2016)
states the applicable forecast annual 2016 California
CPI as “255.0.” 2

This amendment additionally clarifies language in
Regulation 18544(c) regarding the appropriate forecast
annual CPI figure and source. The amended language is
in accordance with Section 82001, which defines the
cost of living adjustment process under the Act.

The formula for adjusting contribution limits and the
voluntary expenditure ceilings, found in Regulation
18544(a)(1) and (2), is stated in the following equation
form:
The formula for calculating the adjustments to state
officeholder accounts contribution limits, found in

1 The Political Reform Act is contained in Government Code Sections
81000 through 91014. All statutory references are to the
Government Code, unless otherwise indicated. The regulations of
the Fair Political Practices Commission are contained in Sections
18110 through 18997 of Title 2 of the California Code of Regulations.
All regulatory references are to Title 2, Division 6 of the
California Code of Regulations, unless otherwise indicated.

Regulation 18544(b), is stated in the following equation
form:

2 A forecast annual CPI is used due to the fact that the actual CPI
for a given year is not available until mid-January of the following
year. See http://www.dof.ca.gov/Forecasting/Economics/
Eco_ Forecasts_Us_Ca/index.html, CPI-U all items for 2016, for
the relevant CPI figure.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z

(2) Biennial Gift Limit Adjustments: Adoption of
Amendments to Regulations 18703.4, 18730, and
18940.2.
The gift limit must also be adjusted biennially by the
Commission to reflect changes in the CPI. (Sections

87103(e) and 89503(f).) The California Department of
Finance (“DOF”) provides the forecast calendar year
California CPI for All Urban Consumers. The formula
used to calculate the adjusted gift limit is as follows:
REGULATORY ACTION

Amend 2 Cal. Code Regs. Sections 18544 and 18545:
The proposed amendments to Regulation 18545 reflect
the adjusted contribution limits and voluntary expenditure
ceilings for state candidates for the period of January
1, 2017 through December 31, 2018.

The proposed amendments to Regulation 18544(c)
clarify language regarding the appropriate forecast annual
CPI figure and source.

Amend 2 Cal. Code Regs. Sections 18700, 18730,
18940.2. The proposed amendments reflect the adjustment
of the gift limit from $460 to $470 for the period of
January 1, 2017 through December 31, 2018.

SCOPE

The Commission may adopt the language noticed
herein, or it may choose new language to implement its
decisions concerning the issues identified above or related
issues. The Commission may delete provisions,
adopt the language noticed herein, or choose new language
to implement its policy regarding implementation
of the CPI adjustments described above.

FISCAL IMPACT STATEMENT

Fiscal Impact on Local Government. This regulation
will have no fiscal impact on any local entity or
program.

Fiscal Impact on State Government. This regulation
will have no fiscal impact on any state entity or
program.

Fiscal Impact on Federal Funding of State Programs.
This regulation will have no fiscal impact on the federal
funding of any state program or entity.

AUTHORITY

Government Code Section 83112 provides that the
Fair Political Practices Commission may adopt, amend,
and rescind rules and regulations to carry out the purposes
and provisions of the Political Reform Act.

REFERENCE

The purpose of this regulation is to implement, interpret,
and make specific the following:

Amend 2 Cal. Code Regs. Sections 18544 and 18545.
Government Code Sections 83124, 85301, 85302,
85303, 85316 and 85400.

Amend 2 Cal. Code Regs. Sections 18700, 18730,
and 18940.2. Government Code Sections 82028,
87100, 87103, 87300-87302, 89502, 89503 and 89506.

CONTACT

You may send inquiries to Karen Harrison, Fair Political
Practices Commission, 428 J Street, Suite 800,
Sacramento, CA 95814; email: kharrison@fppc.ca.
gov; telephone (916) 322-5660 or 1-866-ASK-FPPC.

Proposed regulatory language can be accessed at
http://www.fppc.ca.gov/the-law/fppc-regulations/proposed-
regulations-and-notices.html.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
TITLE 2. PUBLIC EMPLOYEES’
RETIREMENT SYSTEM
Title 2. Administration
Division 1. Administrative Personnel
Chapter 2. Board of Administration of Public
Employees’ Retirement System
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Administration
(Board) of the California Public Employees’
Retirement System (CalPERS) is proposing to take
the regulatory action described below in the Informative
Digest after considering public comments, objections,
and recommendations regarding the proposed
regulatory action.

I. PROPOSED REGULATORY ACTION
In this filing, the Board proposes to add the Section

552.1 to Article 1 of Subchapter 1 of Division 1 of Title
2 of the California Code of Regulations (CCR). The
proposed regulation would (1) limit the subject matter
appropriate for discussion during public comment; (2)
provide a time limit on individual speakers during public
comment; (3) authorize the meeting’s Presiding Officer
to increase or decrease this time limit; and, (4) authorize
the Presiding Officer to stop an individual
speaker from continuing to speak under specified
circumstances.
II. WRITTEN COMMENT PERIOD
Any interested person may submit written comments
relevant to the proposed regulatory action. The written
comment period has been established commencing on
October 14, 2016 and closing on November 28, 2016 at

5:00 p.m. The Regulation Coordinator must receive all
written comments by the close of the comment period.
Comments may be submitted via fax at (916)
795-4607; emailed to Regulation_coordinator@
calpers.ca.gov or mailed to the following address:
Anthony Martin, Regulation Coordinator

California Public Employees’ Retirement System

P.O. Box 942702
Sacramento, CA 94229-2702
Phone: (916) 795-3038
III. PUBLIC HEARING
A public hearing will be held before the CalPERS
Board at the time, date and location listed below.

NOTICE THAT A PUBLIC HEARING
IS SCHEDULED
Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Beginning at 9:00 a.m.

CalPERS Auditorium, Lincoln Plaza North

400 Q Street

Sacramento, CA 95811

IV. ACCESS TO HEARING ROOM
The CalPERS Auditorium will be accessible to persons
with mobility impairments, and it can be made accessible
to persons with hearing or visual impairments
upon advance request to the CalPERS Regulation
Coordinator.

V. AUTHORITY AND REFERENCE
The Board’s authority to add the proposed regulation
to the CCR derives from the Board’s plenary authority
and fiduciary responsibility over the assets of the public
retirement system and exclusive responsibility to administer
the system in a manner that will assure prompt
delivery of benefits and related services to the members
and their beneficiaries, pursuant to the California Constitution
(Section 17 of Article XVI) and in accordance
with California Government Code sections
20120-20121. In addition, other Sections of the California
Government Code that provide authority include
section 11125.7 of the Bagley-Keene Open Meeting
Act (Gov. Code § 11120 et seq., hereinafter referred to
as “the Bagley-Keene Act”).

Reference citations: California Government Code
Sections 11125.7, 20120, and 20121.

VI. INFORMATIVE DIGEST
Article XVI, section 17 of the California Constitution
grants the Board plenary authority and fiduciary responsibility
for administering the retirement system
and investing its assets. Government Code section
20120 similarly vests management and control of the
system in the Board and section 20121 grants the Board
power to make such rules as it deems proper.

The Bagley-Keene Act generally requires that state
bodies conduct their business in open, noticed meetings
so that the public may attend the meetings and have an
opportunity to comment upon the work of the body.
Government Code section 11125 requires a state body
to provide notice at least 10 days in advance of its meetings.
This notice must include a specific agenda that
lists the items of business that the state body will act upon
or discuss at the meeting. Government Code section

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
11125.7 requires that the state body provide an opportunity
for members of the public to directly address the
state body on each agenda item, before or during the
state body’s discussion or consideration of the item. As
state bodies under the Bagley-Keene Act, the Board
and its committees hold regular meetings and frequently
receive public comment from CalPERS members,
employers, stakeholders, and other members of the
public.

Government Code section 11125.7 also authorizes a
state body to adopt reasonable regulations to govern
public comment at meetings. Section 11125.7 specifically
notes that a regulation imposing time limits on individual
speakers is appropriate. The Board is therefore
authorized to adopt regulations over public comment.

The proposed regulation is consistent with current
law and intended to provide a clear set of rules to govern
public comment at meetings of the Board and its
committees.

Specifically, the proposed regulation will:


Define the terms “Body” and “Presiding Officer,”
which are used throughout the proposed
regulation.

Limit public comment to the subject matter at hand
during a meeting. For a particular agenda item,
public comment is limited to issues germane to the
topic of the agenda item. CalPERS also includes a
general “public comment” agenda item during
each meeting, and the proposed regulation limits
public comment on this item to the subject matter
jurisdiction of the respective committee, or of
CalPERS in the case of the Board.

Provide individual speakers with up to three
minutes for public comment on an individual
agenda item. The unused speaking time of one
speaker is not transferable to another member of
the public.

Authorize the Presiding Officer to increase or
decrease the time available for public comment,
based upon several factors that he or she must
consider when exercising this discretion.

Authorize the Presiding Officer to stop a speaker
from providing public comment when the speaker
fails to adhere to the requirements in the proposed
regulation, is unduly repetitious, or engages in any
other disorderly conduct that disrupts, disturbs or
otherwise impedes the orderly conduct of the
meeting.
Policy Statement Overview/Anticipated Benefits

Engagement with members, beneficiaries, stakeholders,
and members of the public is important and an

essential component of good governance. CalPERS has
long welcomed and afforded the opportunity for public
comment at Board and committee meetings. For many
years now, CalPERS has held meetings over the course
of three days each month from February through June
and August through December. The work involved over
the course of those three days encompasses the consideration
of hundreds of pages of agenda items and the
meetings of several committees, culminating in a meeting
of the entire Board on the third day of meetings.
Through this regulation, CalPERS seeks to ensure that

(1) members of the public in attendance at meetings of
the Board and its committees are afforded an equal opportunity
to directly address the Board; and, (2) the
Board is able to accomplish its business in a reasonably
efficient manner. CalPERS anticipates that the proposed
regulation will increase openness and transparency
by bringing greater attention to the availability
of public comment and by clearly laying out the rules
that govern how such comments may be made. The time
limit per speaker coupled with the Presiding Officer’s
ability to increase or decrease that time will have several
beneficial effects. Chiefly, it will promote fairness by
ensuring that each member of the public wishing to
speak has an opportunity to do so on an equal footing
with other speakers. Secondarily, it will help ensure that
the Board is able to complete its agenda in a reasonably
efficient manner. Furthermore, setting forth standardized
rules and time limits in a formal regulation will
help ensure that there is a consistent approach to public
comment at Board and committee meetings and across
the years as the membership of the Board inevitably
changes.
Consistency and Compatibility with Existing
Regulations

CalPERS evaluated whether there were any other
laws or state regulations on this topic and has concluded
that the proposed regulation is neither inconsistent nor
incompatible with existing law or existing state
regulations.

Pre-notice Consultation with the Public

No pre-notice consultation was done with the public,
as the proposed regulation does not involve complex
proposals or a large number of proposals that cannot
easily be reviewed during the comment period.

VII. EFFECT ON SMALL BUSINESS
The proposed regulatory action does not affect small
business because it applies only to CalPERS and those
members of the public who attend meetings of the
Board.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
VIII. DISCLOSURES REGARDING THE
PROPOSED REGULATORY ACTION
A.
MANDATE ON LOCAL AGENCIES AND
SCHOOL DISTRICTS: The proposed regulatory
action does not impose any mandates on local
agencies and school districts.
B.
COSTS OR SAVINGS TO ANY STATE
AGENCY: The proposed regulatory action will
not result in any additional costs or savings to any
State agency.
C.
COSTS TO ANY LOCAL AGENCY OR
SCHOOL DISTRICT: The proposed regulatory
action will not result in any costs on any local
agency or school district.
D.
NONDISCRETIONARY COSTS OR SAVINGS
IMPOSED ON LOCAL AGENCIES: The
proposed regulatory action does not impose any
nondiscretionary costs or savings on local
agencies.
E.
COSTS OR SAVINGS IN FEDERAL
FUNDING. TO THE STATE: The proposed
regulatory action will not result in additional costs
or savings in federal funding to the State.
F.
ADVERSE ECONOMIC IMPACT: The proposed
regulatory action will not have a significant
statewide adverse economic impact directly
affecting businesses, including the ability of
California businesses to compete with businesses
in other states.
G.
COST IMPACT ON REPRESENTATIVE
PRIVATE PERSONS OR BUSINESSES:
CalPERS is not aware of any cost impacts that a
representative private person or business would
necessarily incur in reasonable compliance with
the proposed regulatory action.
H.
RESULTS OF THE ECONOMIC IMPACT
ANALYSIS: The proposed regulatory action: (1)
will not create or eliminate jobs within California;
(2) will not create new businesses or eliminate
existing businesses within California; (3) will not
affect the expansion of businesses currently doing
business within California; and, (4) will benefit
the health and welfare of California residents by
providing a uniform and structured forum for
embers of the public to participate in Board
meetings.
I.
EFFECT ON HOUSING COST: The proposed
regulatory action has no effect on housing cost.
J.
COSTS TO ANY LOCAL AGENCY OR
SCHOOL DISTRICT WHICH MUST BE
REIMBURSED IN ACCORDANCE WITH
GOVERNMENT CODE SECTIONS 17500
THROUGH 17630: there are no costs to any local
agency or school district which must be
reimbursed in accordance with Government Code
sections 17500 through 17630.
IX. CONSIDERATION OF ALTERNATIVES
In accordance with Government Code Section
11346.5(a)(13), the Board must determine that no reasonable
alternative considered by the Board, or that has
otherwise been identified and brought to the attention of
the Board, would be more effective in carrying out the
purpose for which the regulatory action is proposed, or
would be as effective as, and less burdensome to, affected
private persons than the proposed action, or would be
more cost-effective to affected private persons and
equally effective in implementing the statutory policy
or other provision of law.

The Board invites interested persons to present statements
or arguments with respect to alternatives to the
proposed regulations at the scheduled hearing or during
the written comment period.

X. CONTACT PERSON
Please direct inquiries concerning the proposed regulatory
action to:

Anthony Martin, Regulation Coordinator

California Public Employees’ Retirement System

P.O. Box 942702
Sacramento, CA 94229-2702
Phone: (916) 795-3038
The backup contact for these inquiries is:

Christina Nutley, Regulation Coordinator

California Public Employees’ Retirement System

P.O. Box 942702
Sacramento, CA 94229-2702
Phone: (916) 795-3038
Please direct requests concerning the copies of the
proposed text (the “express terms”) of the regulations,
the Initial Statement of Reasons, the modified text of
the regulations, if any, or other information about processing
of this regulatory action to Anthony Martin,
Regulation Coordinator, at

Regulation coordinator@calpers.ca.gov.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
XI. AVAILABILITY OF STATEMENT OF
REASONS AND TEXT OF PROPOSED
REGULATIONS, AND RULEMAKING FILE
The entire rulemaking file is available for public inspection
through the Regulation Coordinator at the address
shown in section II. To date, the file consists of
this Notice, the proposed text of the regulations, the Initial
Statement of Reasons, the Economic Impact Assessment,
and the Economic and Fiscal Impact Statement.
A copy of the proposed text, the Initial Statement
of Reasons, the Economic Impact Assessment, and the
Economic and Fiscal Impact Statement is available at
no charge upon telephone or written request to the Regulation
Coordinator.

For immediate access, the regulatory material regarding
this action can be accessed at CalPERS’ website at
www.calpers.ca.gov.

XII. AVAILABILITY OF CHANGED OR
MODIFIED TEXT
The Board may, on its own motion or at the recommendation
of any interested person, modify the proposed
text of the regulations after the public comment
period closes.

If the Board modifies its regulatory action, it will prepare
a comparison of the original proposed text and the
modifications for an additional public comment period
of not less than 15 days prior to the date on which the
Board adopts, amends, or repeals the resulting regulation.
A copy of the comparison text will be mailed to all
persons who submitted written comments or asked to be
kept informed as to the outcome of this regulatory
action.

XIII. AVAILABILITY OF THE FINAL
STATEMENT OF REASONS
The Final Statement of Reasons can be obtained,
once it has been prepared, by written request to Anthony
Martin, Regulation Coordinator, at the address
shown above in Section II.

TITLE 15. DEPARTMENT OF
CORRECTIONS AND REHABILITATION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Secretary of
the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
(CDCR), pursuant to the authority granted by
Government Code Section 12838.5 and Penal Code
(PC) Section 5055, and the rulemaking authority grant
ed by PC Section 5058, proposes to revise Sections
3620, 3621, and 3622 of the California Code of Regulations
(CCR), Title 15, Division 3, Urinalysis Testing for

parolees.
PUBLIC HEARING
Date and
Time:
Place:
Purpose:
December 9, 2016 — 10:00 a.m.
to 11:00 a.m.
Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation
Kern/Colorado Room
1515 S Street — North Building
Sacramento, CA 95811
To receive comments about this
action.

PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD

The public comment period will close December 9,
2016 at 5:00 p.m. Any person may submit public comments
in writing (by mail, by fax, or by e-mail) regarding
the proposed changes. To be considered by the Department,
comments must be submitted to the CDCR,
Regulation and Policy Management Branch, P.O. Box
942883, Sacramento, CA 94283-0001; by fax at (916)
324-6075; or by e-mail at RPMB@cdcr.ca.gov before
the close of the comment period.

CONTACT PERSON

Please direct any inquiries regarding this action to:

Timothy M. Lockwood, Chief

Regulation and Policy Management Branch

Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

P.O. Box 942883, Sacramento, CA 94283-0001
Telephone (916) 445-2269
In the event the contact person is unavailable, inquiries
should be directed to the following back-up
person:

Sherri Garcia

Regulation and Policy Management Branch

Telephone (916) 445-2266

Questions regarding the substance of the proposed
regulatory action should be directed to:

Roger Gold

Division of Adult Parole Operations

(916) 324-3253
INFORMATIVE DIGEST/POLICY STATEMENT
OVERVIEW

PC Section 5000 provides that commencing July 1,
2005, any reference to the Department of Corrections in

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
this or any code, refers to the CDCR, Division of Adult
Operations.

PC Section 5050 provides that commencing July 1,
2005, any reference to the Director of Corrections, in
this or any other code, refers to the Secretary of the
CDCR. As of that date, the office of the Director of Corrections
is abolished.

PC Section 5054 provides that commencing July 1,
2005, the supervision, management, and control of the
state prisons, and the responsibility for the care, custody,
treatment, training, discipline, and employment of
persons confined therein are vested in the Secretary of
the CDCR.

PC Section 5058 authorizes the Director to prescribe
and amend regulations for the administration of
prisons.

This action:


Updates the revision date in regulation text for the
CDCR 2249 (Rev. 10/15), Urinalysis Sample
Control Log.

Removes the requirement of having the parolee(s)
sign the CDCR 2249 (Rev. 10/15), Urinalysis
Sample Control Log.

Add the requirement for staff to submit the CDCR
2249 (Rev. 10/15), Urinalysis Sample Control Log
to the Unit Supervisor with the caseload roster by
the last working day of the month, documenting all
urinalysis testing tests taken in the month.

Updates the revision date in regulation text for the
CDCR 1515 — Addendum (Rev. 11/15), Special
Conditions of Parole.
FORMS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

CDCR 1515 — Addendum (Rev. 11/15), Special
Conditions of Parole

CDCR 2249 (Rev. 10/15), Urinalysis Sample Control
Log

SPECIFIC BENEFITS ANTICIPATED BY THE
PROPOSED REGULATIONS

The proposed regulatory action may protect public
health and safety and worker safety, and will benefit
CDCR staff and parolees by providing direction on urinalysis
sample collection. Urinalysis test kits include
collection bottles with litmus paper that can instantly
test the urine. This reduces the number of urine samples
requiring confirmation by a laboratory. These protocols
also include the use of the CDCR 2249 (Rev. 10/15),
Urinalysis Sample Control Log.

The Department has determined that staff does not
need to obtain the parolee’s signature on the CDCR

2249. Removing the requirement to obtain the parolee’s
signature improves efficiency.

EVALUATION OF
CONSISTENCY/COMPATIBILITY WITH
EXISTING REGULATIONS
The Department has researched existing regulations
and has determined that these proposed regulations are
consistent and compatible with existing state laws and
regulations. After a review for any regulations that
would relate to or affect this area, CDCR had concluded
that these are the only regulations that concern CDCR
inmates for capacity determination and selection of a
surrogate decision maker.

LOCAL MANDATES

The proposed regulatory action imposes no mandates
on local agencies or school districts, or a mandate which
requires reimbursement pursuant to Government Code
Sections 17500-17630.

FISCAL IMPACT STATEMENT


Cost to any local agency or school district
that is required to be reimbursed: None.

Cost or savings to any state agency: None.

Other nondiscretionary cost or savings
imposed on local agencies: None.

Cost or savings in federal funding to the
State: None.
EFFECT ON HOUSING COSTS

The Department has made an initial determination
that the proposed action will have no significant effect
on housing costs.

SIGNIFICANT ADVERSE ECONOMIC IMPACT
ON BUSINESS

The Department has made an initial determination
that the proposed regulatory action will not have a significant
adverse impact on business in the State of California
because those businesses are not affected by the
internal management of offenders.

RESULTS OF ECONOMIC
IMPACT ASSESSMENT
The Department has determined that the proposed
regulations will have no impact on the creation of new

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
or the elimination of existing jobs or businesses within
California or affect the expansion of businesses currently
doing business in California. The Department has determined
that the proposed regulations will have no effect
on the state’s environment because the proposed
regulations relate strictly to the management of
parolees. The Department has determined that the proposed
regulations may ensure the health, safety and security
of parolees, CDCR employees, contractors, and
other persons and entities by establishing procedures
for parolees required to provide a urinalysis sample.

COST IMPACTS ON REPRESENTATIVE
PRIVATE PERSONS OR BUSINESSES
The Department is not aware of any cost impacts that
a representative private person or business would necessarily
incur in reasonable compliance with the proposed
action.

EFFECT ON SMALL BUSINESSES

The Department has determined that the proposed
regulations may not affect small businesses. It is determined
that this action has no significant adverse economic
impact on small business because they are not affected
by the internal management of state prisons.

CONSIDERATION OF ALTERNATIVES

The Department must determine that no reasonable
alternative considered, or that has otherwise been identified
and brought to the attention of the Department,
would be more effective in carrying out the purpose for
which this action is proposed, would be as effective and
less burdensome to affected private persons than the action
proposed, or would be more cost-effective to affected
private persons and equally effective in implementing
the statutory policy or other provision of law.

Currently, no reasonable alternatives have been
brought to the attention of the Department that would
alter the Department’s initial determination.

AVAILABILITY OF PROPOSED TEXT AND
INITIAL STATEMENT OF REASONS
The Department has prepared, and will make available,
the proposed text and the Initial Statement of Reasons
(ISOR) of the proposed regulations. The rulemaking
file for this regulatory action, which contains those
items and all information on which the proposal is based
(i.e., rulemaking file) is available to the public upon request
directed to the Department’s contact person. The

proposed text, ISOR, and Notice of Proposed Action
will also be made available on the Department’s website
http://www.cdcr.ca.gov.

AVAILABILITY OF THE FINAL STATEMENT
OF REASONS

Following its preparation, a copy of the Final Statement
of Reasons may be obtained from the Department’s
contact person.

AVAILABILITY OF CHANGES TO
PROPOSED TEXT
After considering all timely and relevant comments
received, the Department may adopt the proposed regulations
substantially as described in this Notice. If the
Department makes modifications which are sufficiently
related to the originally proposed text, it will make
the modified text (with the changes clearly indicated)
available to the public for at least 15 days before the Department
adopts the regulations as revised. Requests for
copies of any modified regulation text should be directed
to the contact person indicated in this Notice. The
Department will accept written comments on the modified
regulations for 15 days after the date on which they
are made available.

TITLE 16. CALIFORNIA ARCHITECTS
BOARD/LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS
TECHNICAL COMMITTEE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the California
Architects Board (Board) is proposing to take the action
described in the Informative Digest. Any person interested
may present statements or arguments orally or in
writing relevant to the action proposed at a hearing to be
held at:

California Architects Board

Landscape Architects Technical Committee

2420 Del Paso Road, Suite 105

Sacramento, California 95834

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

10:00 a.m.
Written comments, including those sent by mail, facsimile,
or e-mail to the addresses listed under Contact
Person in this Notice, must be received by the Board at
its office no later than 5:00 p.m. on November 30,
2016, or must be received by the Board at the hearing.
The Board, upon its own motion or at the instance of any
interested party, may thereafter adopt the proposal substantially
as described below or may modify such proposals
if such modifications are sufficiently related to
the original text. With the exception of technical or

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
grammatical changes, the full text of any modified proposal
will be available for 15 days prior to its adoption
from the person designated in this Notice as the contact
person and will be mailed to those persons who submit
written or oral testimony related to this proposal or who
have requested notification of any changes to the
proposal.

Authority and Reference: As a result of legislative reorganization,
the Landscape Architects Technical
Committee (LATC), established on January 1, 1998, replaced
the former Board of Landscape Architects and
was placed under the purview of the Board. Pursuant to
the authority vested by section 5630 of the Business and
Professions Code (BPC), and to implement, interpret,
or make specific section 5681 of said Code, the Board is
considering changes to Division 26 of Title 16 of the
California Code of Regulations (CCR) as follows:

INFORMATIVE DIGEST

A.
Informative Digest
Amend Title 16 CCR Section 2649 — Fees

Existing law, BPC section 5681, authorizes the LATC
to charge a biennial license renewal fee. CCR section
2649 (Fees) specifies that the biennial renewal fee for licenses
expiring on or after July 1, 2009, is $400; the biennial
renewal fee for licenses expiring on or after July
1, 2015, is $220; and, the biennial fee for licenses expiring
on or after July 1, 2017, is $400. This regulatory proposal
would amend CCR section 2649 to extend the
temporary reduction of the biennial license renewal fee
to $220 for licenses expiring on or after July 1, 2017
through June 30, 2019. On July 1, 2019, the biennial renewal
fee would be $400.

BPC section 128.5 requires agencies within the Department
of Consumer Affairs (DCA) to reduce license
or other fees if the fund balance meets or exceeds 24
months in reserve at the end of any fiscal year (FY). The
LATC had 24.7 months of funds in reserve at the end of
FY 2012-13 which exceeded the limit outlined in BPC

128.5. To address the fund condition, the LATC sought
revenue savings measures consisting of a negative budget
change proposal to reduce LATC’s spending authority
by $200,000, and implemented a temporary license
renewal fee reduction from $400 to $220 for one license
renewal cycle, July 1, 2015 through June 30, 2017, with
the intention of extending the license renewal fee reduction
for an additional renewal cycle if the fund condition
did not drop below the 24-month reserve level.
FY 2015-16, the LATC had 27.4 months of funds in
reserve. Based on projections including the current
temporary license renewal fee reduction of $220, at the
end of FY 2016-17, there will be approximately 20.6
months of funds in reserve. Due to the excess fund bal
ance, LATC is proposing to extend the license renewal
fee reduction through June 30, 2019. Once the reduction
completes its term, the LATC is projected to have

7.1 months of funds in reserve. To extend the reduction
of the license renewal fee, a regulatory change to amend
Title 16 CCR section 2649 is necessary.
This regulatory proposal would amend Title 16 CCR
section 2649, subsection (f), to reduce the fee for the biennial
renewal of a license from $400 to $220 for licenses
expiring on or after July 1, 2017 through June 30,
2019. LATC will continue to monitor the fund condition
and assess whether an ongoing reduction is
necessary.

B.
Policy Statement Overview/Anticipated Benefits
of Proposal
The Board is proposing to extend a reduction of the license
renewal fee to ensure compliance with existing
law. Licensees would benefit from this proposal by temporarily
lowering the cost to maintain their license.

C.
Consistency and Compatibility with Existing
State Regulations
After conducting a review for any regulations that
would relate to or affect this area, the Board has evaluated
this regulatory proposal and it is neither inconsistent
nor incompatible with existing state regulations.

FISCAL IMPACT ESTIMATES

Fiscal Impact on Public Agencies Including Costs or
Savings to State Agencies or Cost/Savings in Federal
Funding to the State

By extending the license renewal fee reduction at
$220 for FY 2017-18 and 2018-19, the LATC’s annual
revenue will decrease by approximately $323,460 in
FY 2017-18 and 2018-19. The LATC has sufficient reserves
to cover this loss in revenue without adversely
affecting any of its operations. The LATC has determined
that the license renewal fee reduction will have
no fiscal impact on other state agencies or any federal
funding to the state.
Nondiscretionary Costs/Savings to Local Agencies

None.
Local Mandate

None.
Cost to Any Local Agency or School District for Which
Government Code Sections 17500-17630 Require
Reimbursement

None.
Business Impact

The Board has made an initial determination that the
proposed regulatory action would have no significant
statewide adverse economic impact directly affecting
businesses, including the ability of California businesses
to compete with businesses in other states.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
AND

The following studies/relevant data were relied upon
in making the above determination:

No businesses or individuals would incur any additional
costs as a result of this proposal. This proposal,
temporarily reducing license renewal fees, would save
money for licensees. While this proposal would also

raise the license renewal fee on July 1, 2019, it would
only return to the prior level, thus incurring no additional
costs.

The table below details the total estimated savings of
the affected licensee population which includes the current
(FY’s 2015/16-2016/17) license renewal fee reduction
and proposed (FY’s 2017/18-2018/19) license
renewal fee reduction.
The savings realized by licensees is projected to be
approximately $323,460 each year or $646,920 total
over the two-year duration of the temporary license renewal
fee reduction.

Cost Impact on Representative Private Person or
Business

This proposal would reduce the fee for renewal of a license
from $400 to $220 from July 1, 2017 through
June 30, 2019. The license renewal fee would return to
$400 on July 1, 2019. Therefore, this proposal would affect
private persons by lowering their cost to maintain
their license.
Effect on Housing Costs

None.

EFFECT ON SMALL BUSINESS

The Board has determined that the proposed regulation
would not affect small businesses because it only
affects licensees.

RESULTS OF ECONOMIC IMPACT
ASSESSMENT/ANALYSIS
Impact on Jobs/New Businesses

The Board has determined that this regulatory proposal
will not have a significant impact on the creation
of jobs or new businesses or the elimination of jobs or
existing businesses or the expansion of businesses in the
State of California. This determination was made be
cause the proposed changes, which would spread approximately
$646,920 among nearly 3,593 licensees
over the two-year duration of the proposal, are not sufficient
to create or eliminate jobs or businesses.

Benefits of Regulation

The Board has determined that this regulatory proposal
will have the following benefits to the health and
welfare of California residents, worker safety, and the
state’s environment:

This regulatory proposal would benefit the welfare of
California residents by spreading approximately
$646,920 among nearly 3,593 licensees over the two-
year duration of the proposal. Most of these licensees
are California residents.

This regulatory proposal does not affect worker safety
because it is not related to worker safety in any
manner.

This regulatory proposal does not affect the state’s
environment because it is not related to the environment
in any manner.

CONSIDERATION OF ALTERNATIVES

The Board must determine that no reasonable alternative
it considered to the regulation or that has otherwise
been identified and brought to its attention would be
more effective in carrying out the purpose for which the
action is proposed, would be as effective and less burdensome
to affected private persons than the proposal
described in this Notice, or would be more cost-
effective to affected private persons and equally effec
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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
tive in implementing the statutory policy or other provision
of law.

Any interested person may present statements or arguments
orally or in writing relevant to the above determinations
at the above-mentioned hearing.

INITIAL STATEMENT OF REASONS
AND INFORMATION

The Board has prepared an initial statement of the
reasons for the proposed action and has available all the
information upon which the proposal is based.

TEXT OF PROPOSAL

Copies of the exact language of the proposed regulations
and of the initial statement of reasons, and all of
the information upon which the proposal is based, may
be obtained at the hearing or prior to the hearing upon
request from the California Architects Board, Landscape
Architects Technical Committee at 2420 Del Paso
Road, Suite 105, Sacramento, California 95834, or
by contacting the individuals listed below.

AVAILABILITY AND LOCATION OF THE FINAL
STATEMENT OF REASONS AND
RULEMAKING FILE
All the information upon which the proposed regulations
are based is contained in the rulemaking file,
which is available for public inspection by contacting
the person, named below.

You may obtain a copy of the final statement of reasons
once it has been prepared, by making a written request
to the contact person named below or by accessing
the website listed below.

CONTACT PERSON

Inquiries or comments concerning the proposed rule-
making action may be addressed to:

Name: Tremaine Palmer
Address: California Architects Board
Landscape Architects Technical
Committee
2420 Del Paso Road, Suite 105
Sacramento, CA 95834
Telephone
No.: (916) 575-7233
Fax No.: (916) 575-7283
E-mail
Address: Tremaine.Palmer@dca.ca.gov

The backup contact person is:

Name: Trish Rodriguez
Address: California Architects Board
Landscape Architects Technical
Committee
2420 Del Paso Road, Suite 105
Sacramento, CA 95834
Telephone
No.: (916) 575-7231
Fax No.: (916) 575-7283
E-mail
Address: Trish.Rodriguez@dca.ca.gov

Website Access: Materials regarding this proposal
can be found at www.latc.ca.gov.

TITLE 27. OFFICE OF
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD
ASSESSMENT
SAFE DRINKING WATER AND TOXIC
ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1986
PROPOSITION 65
AMENDMENT TO SECTION 25204(f)
SAFE USE DETERMINATION

PUBLIC HEARINGS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Office of Environmental
Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) proposes
amending Section 25204(f) of Title 27 of the California
Code of Regulations1 to provide for an optional
public hearing concerning an accepted Safe Use Determination
(SUD) request.

PUBLIC PROCEEDINGS

Any written comments concerning this proposed action,
regardless of the form or method of transmission,
must be received by OEHHA by 5:00 p.m. on November
28, 2016, the designated close of the written comment
period. All comments received will be posted on
the OEHHA website at the close of the public comment
period.

The public is encouraged to submit written information
via e-mail, rather than in paper form. Send e-mail
comments to P65Public.Comments@oehha.ca.gov.
Please include “Section 25204(f) SUD Hearings” in the
subject line. Hard-copy comments may be mailed,

1 All further references are to sections of Title 27, Cal. Code of
Regs., unless otherwise indicated.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
faxed, or delivered in person to the appropriate address

below.
Mailing
Address: Ms. Monet Vela
Office of Environmental Health
Hazard Assessment
P.O. Box 4010, MS-23B
Sacramento, California
95812-4010
Fax: (916) 323-2610
Street
Address: 1001 I Street
Sacramento, California 95814

Please be aware that OEHHA is subject to the California
Public Records Act and other laws that require
the release of certain information upon request. Comments
on all regulatory and other actions are routinely
posted on our website. By sending us your comments
you are waiving any right to privacy you may have in
the information you provide. Individual commenters
should advise OEHHA when submitting documents to
request redaction of home address or personal telephone
numbers. Names of commenters will not be
redacted.

A public hearing on this proposed regulatory amendment
will be scheduled on request. To request a hearing
send an e-mail to Monet Vela at monet.
vela@oehha.ca.gov or to the address listed above by no
later than November 14, 2016, which is 14 days before
the close of the comment period. OEHHA will mail a
notice of the hearing to the requester and interested parties
on the Proposition 65 mailing list for regulatory
public hearings. The notice will also be posted on the
OEHHA web site at least ten days before the public
hearing date. The notice will provide the date, time, and
location of the hearing.

If a hearing is scheduled and you have special accommodation
or language needs, please contact Monet Vela
at (916) 323-2517 or monet.vela@oehha.ca.gov at
least one week in advance of the hearing. TTY/TDD/
Speech-to-Speech users may dial 7-1-1 for the California
Relay Service.

CONTACT

Please direct inquiries concerning the proposed regulatory
action described in this notice to Monet Vela, in
writing at the address given above, via e-mail to
monet.vela@oehha.ca.gov or (916) 323-2517. Carl
DeNigris will be a back-up contact. He can be contacted
at (916) 322-5624 or carl.denigris@oehha.ca.gov.

AUTHORITY

Health and Safety Code Section 25249.12.

REFERENCE

Health and Safety Code Sections 25249.5, 25249.6,
25249.7, 25249.9, 25249.10 and 25249.11.

INFORMATIVE DIGEST/POLICY STATEMENT
OVERVIEW

Proposition 65 prohibits a person in the course of doing
business from knowingly and intentionally exposing
any individual to a chemical that has been listed as
known to the State to cause cancer or reproductive
toxicity, without first giving clear and reasonable warning
to such individual2. The Act also prohibits a business
from knowingly discharging a listed chemical into
water or onto or into land where such chemical passes or
probably will pass into any source of drinking water3.
Warnings are not required and the discharge prohibition
does not apply when exposures are insignificant.4
SUDs represent OEHHA’s best judgment concerning
the application of the Act to a particular exposure represented
in a SUD request.

Section 25204 of the California Code of Regulations,
Title 27, sets out the procedures and criteria for requesting
that OEHHA issue a formal written opinion known
as a SUD. Currently, section 25204(f) states that interested
persons will be advised that they may comment on
an accepted SUD request “in writing or in person at a
public hearing which shall be held on a date not less than
30 days after the notice is published.” Under this language,
OEHHA is required to hold a public hearing
even if one is not necessary. SUD hearings often are not
well attended and members of the public seldom make
comments at the hearing. Committing the agency to
hold a public hearing in all instances is neither necessary
nor prudent in establishing an efficient SUD
process.

The proposed regulation would adopt the following
underlined language:

(f) In the case of a request for safe use
determination that appears to comply with these
procedures, the lead agency shall issue a written
acceptance of the request. At the same time, a
public notice of the acceptance of the request will
be submitted for publication in the California
Regulatory Notice Register and sent to interested
2Health and Safety Code section 25249.6.
3Health and Safety Code section 25249.5.
4Health and Safety Code sections 25249.9 and 25249.10.
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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
persons. The public notice will include the text or a
summary of the request as appropriate. It will
advise interested persons that they may comment
on the request in writing or in person if a public
hearing is requested. Any interested person may
request at a public hearing no later than 15 days
prior to the close of the written comment period. If
requested, the hearingwhich shall be held on a
date not less than 30 days after the notice is
published.

Further details on the basis for the proposed amendment
to Section 25204(f) are provided in the Initial
Statement of Reasons for this regulatory amendment,
which is available on request from Monet Vela and is
posted on the OEHHA web site at www.oehha.ca.gov.

ANTICIPATED BENEFITS OF THE
PROPOSED REGULATION
The agency, the public, and the business community
will benefit from the proposed amendment because it
will save the time and resources necessary for holding a
public hearing in many instances where no hearing is
needed, and potentially streamline the SUD request
process. The voluntary SUD process provides a way for
affected businesses to determine whether a warning is
required for a specific exposure, or whether a specific
discharge of a listed chemical to a source of drinking
water is prohibited. This amendment is likely to make
that process less burdensome on the businesses that use
it while maintaining the openness and transparency in
the Safe Use Determination process.

NO INCONSISTENCY OR INCOMPATIBILITY
WITH EXISTING REGULATIONS

OEHHA has determined that the proposed amendment
is neither inconsistent nor incompatible with existing
state regulations because it does not address compliance
with any other law or regulation. On the contrary,
it is consistent with the hearing process of the California
Administrative Procedure Act, which allows an
agency not to hold a rulemaking hearing if there are no
requests for one.5

LOCAL MANDATE/FISCAL IMPACT

Because Proposition 65 expressly6 does not apply to
local agencies or school districts, OEHHA has determined
the proposed regulatory action would not impose
a mandate on local agencies or school districts; nor does

5 See Government Code sections 11346.5(a)(17) and 11346.8.
6 See Health and Safety Code section 25249.11(b).
it require reimbursement by the State pursuant to Part 7
(commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of the
Government Code. OEHHA has also determined that
no nondiscretionary costs or savings to local agencies
or school districts will result from the proposed regulatory
action.

COSTS OR SAVINGS TO STATE AGENCIES

Because this regulatory amendment will reduce the
number of public hearings that OEHHA is required to
hold, this action is likely to result in significant cost savings
to OEHHA. No other savings or increased costs to
any other State agency will result from the proposed
regulatory action.

EFFECT ON FEDERAL FUNDING TO
THE STATE
Because Proposition 65 expressly7 does not apply to
any federal agency, OEHHA has determined that no
costs or savings in federal funding to the State will result
from the proposed regulatory action.

EFFECT ON HOUSING COSTS

OEHHA has determined that the proposed regulatory
action will have no effect on housing costs.

SIGNIFICANT STATEWIDE ADVERSE
ECONOMIC IMPACT DIRECTLY AFFECTING
BUSINESS, INCLUDING ABILITY TO COMPETE
Because the proposed regulatory amendment does
not impose any mandatory requirements on businesses
subject to the Act, OEHHA has made an initial determination
that this amendment will not have a significant
statewide adverse economic impact directly affecting
businesses, including the ability of California businesses
to compete with businesses in other states.

RESULTS OF ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS
(Gov. Code section 11346.3(b))

Impact on the Creation, Elimination, or Expansion
of Jobs/Businesses in California

This regulatory proposal will not affect the creation
or elimination of jobs or businesses within the State of
California, nor will it impact the expansion of existing
businesses in the State. Proposition 65 requires businesses
with ten or more employees to provide warnings
when they expose people to chemicals that are known to

7 See Health and Safety Code section 25249.11(b).

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
cause cancer or reproductive harm. The law also prohibits
the discharge of listed chemicals into sources of
drinking water. The voluntary SUD process provides a
way for affected businesses to determine whether a
warning is required for a specific exposure, or whether a
specific discharge of a listed chemical to a source of
drinking water is prohibited.

This regulatory proposal does not create additional
compliance requirements, but instead removes a requirement
that a public hearing be held after the acceptance
of any SUD request. This amendment is likely to
make that process less burdensome on businesses that
choose to make use of the process.

CONSIDERATION OF ALTERNATIVES

Government Code section 11346.5(a)(13) requires
that OEHHA must determine that no reasonable alternative
considered by OEHHA or that has otherwise
been identified and brought to the attention of OEHHA
would be more effective in carrying out the purpose for
which the action is proposed, would be as effective and
less burdensome to affected private persons than the
proposed action, or would be more cost-effective to affected
private persons and equally effective in implementing
the statutory policy or other provision of law
than the proposal described in this Notice.

EFFECT ON SMALL BUSINESSES

OEHHA has determined that the proposed amendment
will not impose any mandatory requirements on
small business. Rather, the amendment will benefit
small businesses subject to the Act because it will simplify
a process that helps determine whether or not an
exposure for which they are responsible is subject to the
warning requirement or discharge prohibition of the
Act.

COST IMPACTS ON REPRESENTATIVE
PRIVATE PERSONS OR BUSINESSES
OEHHA is not aware of any cost impacts that a representative
private person or business would necessarily
incur in reasonable compliance with the proposed
action.

AVAILABILITY OF STATEMENT OF REASONS
AND TEXT OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS

OEHHA has prepared and has available for public review
an Initial Statement of Reasons for the regulation,
which contains the text of the regulation, and all the information
upon which the regulation is based (rulemaking
file). A copy of the Initial Statement of Reasons and
the text of the regulation, as well as the complete rule-
making file, are available upon request from OEHHA at
the address, e-mail address and telephone number indicated
above. These documents are also posted on
OEHHA’s Web site at www.oehha.ca.gov.

AVAILABILITY OF CHANGED OR
MODIFIED TEXT
The full text of any regulation which is changed or
modified from the express terms of this proposed action
will be made available at least 15 days prior to the date
on which OEHHA adopts the resulting regulation. Notice
of the comment period on changed regulations and
the full text will be mailed to individuals who testified
or submitted written comments at the public hearing, if
held, or whose comments were received by OEHHA
during the public comment period, and anyone who requests
notification from OEHHA of the availability of
such changes. Copies of the notice and the changed regulation
will also be available on the OEHHA Web site at
www.oehha.ca.gov.

AVAILABILITY OF FINAL STATEMENT
OF REASONS
A copy of the Final Statement of Reasons may be obtained,
when it becomes available, from OEHHA at the
address, e-mail address and telephone number indicated
above, and on the OEHHA website at
www.oehha.ca.gov.

GENERAL PUBLIC INTEREST
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CARE
SERVICES
PROPOSED CHANGES TO 1915(i) PROGRAM

The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS),
working in conjunction with the Department of Developmental
Services (DDS), will submit a Medi-Cal

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
State Plan Amendment (SPA) 16-047 with the intention
to include the following changes to the 1915(i) Program,
effective October 1, 2016:


Add a median rate methodology for
Licensed/Certified Residential Services, a
sub-component of Habilitation-Community
Living Arrangement Services. This methodology
requires that rates negotiated for new providers
may not exceed the regional center’s current
median rate for the same service, or the statewide
median rate, whichever is lower. The addition of
this rate methodology will expand the number of
residential facilities available to 1915(i)
participants.

Add Participant direction of services as an option
for the already approved Respite, Nursing and
Non-Medical Transportation services.

Add Community-Based Training Services as a
new service as well as associated rate
methodology. The rate is established in state law
(Welfare and Institutions Code Section
4688.21(c)(7)) at $14.99 per hour.

Add Financial Management Services as a new
service to support the participant direction of
services as referenced above. The rates for this
service are established in state regulation (Title 17,
California Code of Regulations, Section
58888(b)), and range from $45.88 to $96.86 per
month based on the number of participant directed
services used or the type of financial management
arrangement.
The total estimated 2016-17 and 2017-18 fiscal impact
of these proposed changes is $12,670,000 and
$13,070,000 respectively. The fiscal impact by service
is as follows:
These changes will increase reimbursement and will
not decrease access to services.

Public Review and Comments

A copy of the 1915(i) state plan amendment will be
available at: http://www.dhcs.ca.gov/formsandpubs/
laws/Pages/Pro_SPA.aspx. If you would like to view
the state plan amendment in person, please, visit your
local regional center or county welfare department/
county health department, or contact the email address
and mail address below. Comments regarding the
1915(i) state plan amendment will be accepted through
October 30, 2016 and can be sent via email to Ashley
Draper at ashley.draper@dds.ca.gov or via hard copy
to:

Department of Developmental Services

Community Services Division

1600 Ninth Street, Room 320 (M.S. 3-8)

Sacramento, CA 95814

ATTN: Ashley Draper

A copy of the public comments may be requested in
writing to the same address and email inbox identified
above. Please indicate [SPA/Proposed Rate Changes to
1915(i) Program] in the subject line or message.

PROPOSITION 65
OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT
SAFE DRINKING WATER AND TOXIC
ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1986
(PROPOSITION 65)
NOTICE TO INTERESTED PARTIES
September 30, 2016
CHEMICAL LISTED EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER
30, 2016
AS KNOWN TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA
TO CAUSE CANCER:
FURFURYL ALCOHOL

Effective September 30, 2016, the Office of Environmental
Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) is
adding furfuryl alcohol (CAS No. 98-00-0) to the list of

1852

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
chemicals known to the state to cause cancer for purposes
of Proposition 651.

The listing of furfuryl alcohol is based on formal
identification by the US Environmental Protection
Agency (US EPA), an authoritative body2, that the
chemical causes cancer. The criteria used by OEHHA
for the listing of chemicals under the “authoritative
bodies” mechanism can be found in Title 27, Cal. Code
of Regs., section 25306.

The documentation supporting OEHHA’s determination
that the criteria for administrative listing have been
satisfied for furfuryl alcohol is included in the “Notice
of Intent to List Furfuryl Alcohol” posted on OEHHA’s
website and published in the July 31, 2015 issue of the
California Regulatory Notice Register (Register 2015,
No 31-Z). The publication of the notice initiated a public
comment period that closed on September 30, 2015.
OEHHA received public comments on furfuryl alcohol.
The comments and OEHHA’s responses are posted with
the Notice of Intent to List.

A complete, updated chemical list will be published
in the October 14, 2016 issue of the California Regulatory
Notice Register and is available on the OEHHA
website at:
http://oehha.ca.gov/proposition-65/proposition-65-
list.

In summary, furfuryl alcohol is listed under Proposi
1 The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986,
Health and Safety Code section 25249.5 et seq.
2 See Health and Safety Code section 25249.8(b) and Title 27,
Cal. Code of Regs., section 25306.
tion 65 as known to the state to cause cancer, as follows:

Chemical CAS No. EndpointListing
Mechanism*
Furfuryl
alcohol
98-00-0 Cancer AB (US EPA)

*Listing mechanism: AB — “authoritative bodies” mechanism
(Title 27, Cal. Code of Regs. section 25306).

OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT
SAFE DRINKING WATER AND TOXIC
ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1986
CHEMICALS KNOWN TO THE STATE
TO CAUSE CANCER OR
REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY
August 5, 2016
The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act
of 1986 requires that the Governor revise and republish
at least once per year the list of chemicals known to the
State to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity. The identification
number indicated in the following list is the
Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number.
No CAS number is given when several substances are
presented as a single listing. The date refers to the initial
appearance of the chemical on the list. For easy reference,
chemicals which are shown underlined are newly
added. Chemicals which are shown with a strikeout
were placed on the list with the date noted, and have
subsequently been removed.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
CHEMICALS KNOWN TO THE STATE TO CAUSE CANCER
Chemical CAS Number Date

A-alpha-C (2-Amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole) 26148-68-5 January 1, 1990
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 April 1, 1988
Acetamide 60-35-5 January 1, 1990
Acetochlor 34256-82-1 January 1, 1989
2-Acetylaminofluorene 53-96-3 July 1, 1987
Acifluorfen sodium 62476-59-9 January 1, 1990
Acrylamide 79-06-1 January 1, 1990
Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 July 1, 1987
Actinomycin D 50-76-0 October 1, 1989
AF-2;[2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)]acrylamide 3688-53-7 July 1, 1987
Aflatoxins — January 1, 1988
Alachlor 15972-60-8 January 1, 1989
Alcoholic beverages, when associated with alcohol abuse — July 1, 1988
Aldrin 309-00-2 July 1, 1988
Allyl chloride Delisted October 29, 1999 107-05-1 January 1, 1990
Aloe vera, non-decolorized whole leaf extract December 4, 2015
2-Aminoanthraquinone 117-79-3 October 1, 1989
p-Aminoazobenzene 60-09-3 January 1, 1990
ortho-Aminoazotoluene 97-56-3 July 1, 1987
4-Aminobiphenyl (4-aminodiphenyl) 92-67-1 February 27, 1987
1-Amino-2,4-dibromoanthraquinone 81-49-2 August 26, 1997
3-Amino-9-ethylcarbazole hydrochloride 6109-97-3 July 1, 1989
2-Aminofluorene 153-78-6 January 29, 1999
1-Amino-2-methylanthraquinone 82-28-0 October 1, 1989
2-Amino-5-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazole 712-68-5 July 1, 1987
4-Amino-2-nitrophenol 119-34-6 January 29, 1999
Amitrole 61-82-5 July 1, 1987
Amsacrine 51264-14-3 August 7, 2009
Analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin — February 27, 1987
Androstenedione 63-05-8 May 3, 2011
Aniline 62-53-3 January 1, 1990
Aniline hydrochloride 142-04-1 May 15, 1998
ortho-Anisidine 90-04-0 July 1, 1987
ortho-Anisidine hydrochloride 134-29-2 July 1, 1987
Anthraquinone 84-65-1 September 28, 2007
Antimony oxide (Antimony trioxide) 1309-64-4 October 1, 1990
Aramite 140-57-8 July 1, 1987
Areca nut — February 3, 2006
Aristolochic acids — July 9, 2004
Arsenic (inorganic arsenic compounds) — February 27, 1987
Asbestos 1332-21-4 February 27, 1987
Auramine 492-80-8 July 1, 1987
Azacitidine 320-67-2 January 1, 1992
Azaserine 115-02-6 July 1, 1987

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Azathioprine 446-86-6 February 27, 1987
Azobenzene 103-33-3 January 1, 1990

Benthiavalicarb-isopropyl 177406-68-7 July 1, 2008
Benz[a]anthracene 56-55-3 July 1, 1987
Benzene 71-43-2 February 27, 1987
Benzidine [and its salts] 92-87-5 February 27, 1987
Benzidine-based dyes — October 1, 1992
Benzo[b]fluoranthene 205-99-2 July 1, 1987
Benzo[j]fluoranthene 205-82-3 July 1, 1987
Benzo[k]fluoranthene 207-08-9 July 1, 1987
Benzofuran 271-89-6 October 1, 1990
Benzophenone 119-61-9 June 22, 2012
Benzo[a]pyrene 50-32-8 July 1, 1987
Benzotrichloride 98-07-7 July 1, 1987
Benzyl chloride 100-44-7 January 1, 1990
Benzyl violet 4B 1694-09-3 July 1, 1987
Beryllium and beryllium compounds — October 1, 1987
Betel quid with tobacco — January 1, 1990
Betel quid without tobacco — February 3, 2006
2,2-Bis(bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol 3296-90-0 May 1, 1996
Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether 111-44-4 April 1, 1988
N,N-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-2-naphthylamine (Chlornapazine) 494-03-1 February 27, 1987
Bischloroethyl nitrosourea (BCNU) (Carmustine) 154-93-8 July 1, 1987
Bis(chloromethyl)ether 542-88-1 February 27, 1987
Bis(2-chloro-l-methylethyl) ether, technical grade — October 29, 1999
Bitumens, extracts of steam-refined and air refined — January 1, 1990
Bracken fern — January 1, 1990
Bromate 15541-45-4 May 31, 2002
Bromochloroacetic acid 5589-96-8 April 6, 2010
Bromodichloroacetic acid 71133-14-7 July 29, 2016
Bromodichloromethane 75-27-4 January 1, 1990
Bromoethane 74-96-4 December 22, 2000
Bromoform 75-25-2 April 1, 1991
1-Bromopropane 106-94-5 August 5, 2016
1,3-Butadiene 106-99-0 April 1, 1988
1,4-Butanediol dimethanesulfonate (Busulfan) 55-98-1 February 27, 1987
Butylated hydroxyanisole 25013-16-5 January 1, 1990
beta-Butyrolactone 3068-88-0 July 1, 1987

Cacodylic acid 75-60-5 May 1, 1996
Cadmium and cadmium compounds — October 1, 1987
Caffeic acid 331-39-5 October 1, 1994
Captafol 2425-06-1 October 1, 1988
Captan 133-06-2 January 1, 1990
Carbaryl 63-25-2 February 5, 2010
Carbazole 86-74-8 May 1, 1996
Carbon black (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size) 1333-86-4 February 21, 2003
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 October 1, 1987
Carbon-black extracts — January 1, 1990
N-Carboxymethyl-N-nitrosourea 60391-92-6 January 25, 2002
Catechol 120-80-9 July 15, 2003
Ceramic fibers (airborne particles of respirable size) — July 1, 1990
Certain combined chemotherapy for lymphomas — February 27,1987

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Chloral 75-87-6 September 13, 2013
Chloral hydrate 302-17-0 September 13, 2013
Chlorambucil 305-03-3 February 27, 1987
Chloramphenicol Delisted January 4, 2013 56-75-7 October 1, 1989
Chloramphenicol sodium succinate 982-57-0 September 27, 2013
Chlordane 57-74-9 July 1, 1988
Chlordecone (Kepone) 143-50-0 January 1,
1988Chlordimeform 6164-98-3 January 1, 1989
Chlorendic acid 115-28-6 July 1, 1989
Chlorinated paraffins (Average chain length, C12; approximately

60 percent chlorine by weight) 108171-26-2 July 1, 1989
p-Chloroaniline 106-47-8 October 1, 1994
p-Chloroaniline hydrochloride 20265-96-7 May 15, 1998
Chlorodibromomethane Delisted October 29, 1999 124-48-1 January 1, 1990
Chloroethane (Ethyl chloride) 75-00-3 July 1, 1990
1-(2-Chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-l-nitrosourea (CCNU) 13010-47-4 January 1, 1988

(Lomustine)
1-(2-Chloroethyl)-3-(4-methylcyclohexyl)-l-nitrosourea 13909-09-6 October 1, 1988

(Methyl-CCNU)
Chloroform 67-66-3 October 1, 1987
Chloromethyl methyl ether (technical grade) 107-30-2 February 27, 1987
3-Chloro-2-methylpropene 563-47-3 July 1, 1989
1-Chloro-4-nitrobenzene 100-00-5 October 29, 1999
4-Chloro-ortho-phenylenediamine 95-83-0 January 1, 1988
p-Chloro-o-toluidine 95-69-2 January 1, 1990
p-Chloro-o-toluidine, strong acid salts of — May 15, 1998
5-Chloro-o-toluidine and its strong acid salts — October 24, 1997
Chloroprene 126-99-8 June 2, 2000
Chlorothalonil 1897-45-6 January 1, 1989
Chlorotrianisene 569-57-3 September 1, 1996
Chlorozotocin 54749-90-5 January 1, 1992
Chromium (hexavalent compounds) — February 27, 1987
Chrysene 218-01-9 January 1, 1990

C.I. Acid Red 114 6459-94-5 July 1, 1992
C.I. Basic Red 9 monohydrochloride 569-61-9 July 1, 1989
C.I. Direct Blue 15 2429-74-5 August 26, 1997
C.I. Direct Blue 218 28407-37-6 August 26, 1997
C.I. Disperse Yellow 3 2832-40-8 February 8, 2013
C.I. Solvent Yellow 14 842-07-9 May 15, 1998
Ciclosporin (Cyclosporin A; Cyclosporine) 59865-13-3 January 1, 1992
79217-60-0
Cidofovir 113852-37-2 January 29, 1999
Cinnamyl anthranilate 87-29-6 July 1, 1989
Cisplatin 15663-27-1 October 1, 1988
Citrus Red No. 2 6358-53-8 October 1, 1989
Clofibrate 637-07-0 September 1, 1996
Clomiphene citrate 50-41-9 May 24, 2013
CMNP (pyrazachlor) 6814-58-0 August 21, 2015
Cobalt metal powder 7440-48-4 July 1, 1992
Cobalt [II] oxide 1307-96-6 July 1, 1992
Cobalt sulfate 10124-43-3 May 20, 2005
Cobalt sulfate heptahydrate 10026-24-1 June 2, 2000
Coconut oil diethanolamine condensate (cocamide diethanolamine) — June 22, 2012

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Coke oven emissions — February 27, 1987
Conjugated estrogens — February 27, 1987
Creosotes — October 1, 1988
para-Cresidine 120-71-8 January 1, 1988
Cumene 98-82-8 April 6, 2010
Cupferron 135-20-6 January 1, 1988
Cycasin 14901-08-7 January 1, 1988Cyclopenta[
cd]pyrene 27208-37-3 April 29, 2011
Cyclophosphamide (anhydrous) 50-18-0 February 27, 1987
Cyclophosphamide (hydrated) 6055-19-2 February 27, 1987
Cytembena 21739-91-3 May 15, 1998

D&C Orange No. 17 3468-63-1 July 1, 1990
D&C Red No. 8 2092-56-0 October 1, 1990
D&C Red No. 9 5160-02-1 July 1, 1990
D&C Red No. 19 81-88-9 July 1, 1990
Dacarbazine 4342-03-4 January 1, 1988
Daminozide 1596-84-5 January 1, 1990
Dantron (Chrysazin; 1,8-Dihydroxyanthraquinone) 117-10-2 January 1, 1992
Daunomycin 20830-81-3 January 1, 1988
DDD (Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane) 72-54-8 January 1, 1989
DDE (Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene) 72-55-9 January 1, 1989
DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) 50-29-3 October 1, 1987
DDVP (Dichlorvos) 62-73-7 January 1, 1989
N,N’-Diacetylbenzidine 613-35-4 October 1, 1989
2,4-Diaminoanisole 615-05-4 October 1, 1990
2,4-Diaminoanisole sulfate 39156-41-7 January 1, 1988
4,4’-Diaminodiphenyl ether (4,4’-Oxydianiline) 101-80-4 January 1, 1988
2,4-Diaminotoluene 95-80-7 January 1, 1988
Diaminotoluene (mixed) Delisted November 20, 2015 — January 1, 1990
Diazoaminobenzene 136-35-6 May 20, 2005
Dibenz[a,h]acridine 226-36-8 January 1, 1988
Dibenz[a,j]acridine 224-42-0 January 1, 1988
Dibenzanthracenes — December 26, 2014
Dibenz[a,c]anthracene 215-58-7 December 26, 2014
Dibenz[a,h]anthracene 53-70-3 January 1, 1988
Dibenz[a,j]anthracene 224-41-9 December 26, 2014
7H-Dibenzo[c,g]carbazole 194-59-2 January 1, 1988
Dibenzo[a,e]pyrene 192-65-4 January 1, 1988
Dibenzo[a,h]pyrene 189-64-0 January 1, 1988
Dibenzo[a,i]pyrene 189-55-9 January 1, 1988
Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene 191-30-0 January 1, 1988
Dibromoacetic acid 631-64-1 June 17, 2008
Dibromoacetonitrile 3252-43-5 May 3, 2011
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) 96-12-8 July 1, 1987
2,3-Dibromo-1-propanol 96-13-9 October 1, 1994
Dichloroacetic acid 79-43-6 May 1, 1996
p-Dichlorobenzene 106-46-7 January 1, 1989
3,3’-Dichlorobenzidine 91-94-1 October 1, 1987
3,3’-Dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride 612-83-9 May 15, 1998
1,4-Dichloro-2-butene 764-41-0 January 1, 1990
3,3’-Dichloro-4,4’-diaminodiphenyl ether 28434-86-8 January 1, 1988
1,1-Dichloroethane 75-34-3 January 1, 1990

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Dichloromethane (Methylene chloride) 75-09-2 April 1, 1988
1,2-Dichloropropane 78-87-5 January 1, 1990
1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP) 96-23-1 October 8, 2010
1,3-Dichloropropene 542-75-6 January 1, 1989
Diclofop-methyl 51338-27-3 April 6, 2010
Dieldrin 60-57-1 July 1, 1988
Dienestrol Delisted January 4, 2013 84-17-3 January 1, 1990
Diepoxybutane 1464-53-5 January 1, 1988
Diesel engine exhaust — October 1, 1990
Diethanolamine 111-42-2 June 22, 2012
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 117-81-7 January 1, 1988
1,2-Diethylhydrazine 1615-80-1 January 1, 1988
Diethyl sulfate 64-67-5 January 1, 1988
Diethylstilbestrol (DES) 56-53-1 February 27, 1987
Diglycidyl resorcinol ether (DGRE) 101-90-6 July 1, 1989
Dihydrosafrole 94-58-6 January 1, 1988
Diisononyl phthalate (DINP) — December 20, 2013
Diisopropyl sulfate 2973-10-6 April 1, 1993
3,3’-Dimethoxybenzidine (ortho-Dianisidine) 119-90-4 January 1, 1988
3,3’-Dimethoxybenzidine dihydrochloride (ortho-Dianisidine

dihydrochloride) 20325-40-0 October 1, 1990
3,3’-Dimethoxybenzidine-based dyes metabolized to

3,3’-dimethoxybenzidine — June 11, 2004
3,3’-Dimethylbenzidine-based dyes metabolized to

3,3’-dimethylbenzidine — June 11, 2004
Dimethyl sulfate 77-78-1 January 1, 1988
4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene 60-11-7 January 1, 1988
trans-2-[(Dimethylamino)methylimino]-5-[2-(5-nitro-2-

furyl)vinyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazole 55738-54-0 January 1, 1988
7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene 57-97-6 January 1, 1990
3,3’-Dimethylbenzidine (ortho-Tolidine) 119-93-7 January 1, 1988
3,3’-Dimethylbenzidine dihydrochloride 612-82-8 April 1, 1992
Dimethylcarbamoyl chloride 79-44-7 January 1, 1988
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) 57-14-7 October 1, 1989
1,2-Dimethylhydrazine 540-73-8 January 1, 1988
2,6-Dimethyl-N-nitrosomorpholine (DMNM) 1456-28-6 February 8, 2013
N,N-Dimethyl-p-toluidine 99-97-8 May 2, 2014
Dimethylvinylchloride 513-37-1 July 1, 1989
3,7-Dinitrofluoranthene 105735-71-5 August 26, 1997
3,9-Dinitrofluoranthene 22506-53-2 August 26, 1997
1,3-Dinitropyrene 75321-20-9 November 2, 2012
1,6-Dinitropyrene 42397-64-8 October 1, 1990
1,8-Dinitropyrene 42397-65-9 October 1, 1990
Dinitrotoluene mixture, 2,4-/2,6- — May 1, 1996
2,4-Dinitrotoluene 121-14-2 July 1, 1988
2,6-Dinitrotoluene 606-20-2 July 1, 1995
Di-n-propyl isocinchomeronate (MGK Repellent 326) 136-45-8 May 1, 1996
1,4-Dioxane 123-91-1 January 1, 1988
Diphenylhydantoin (Phenytoin) 57-41-0 January 1, 1988
Diphenylhydantoin (Phenytoin), sodium salt 630-93-3 January 1, 1988
Direct Black 38 (technical grade) 1937-37-7 January 1, 1988
Direct Blue 6 (technical grade) 2602-46-2 January 1, 1988
Direct Brown 95 (technical grade) 16071-86-6 October 1, 1988

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Disperse Blue 1 2475-45-8 October 1, 1990
Diuron 330-54-1 May 31, 2002
Doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin) 25316-40-9 July 1, 1987

Emissions from combustion of coal — August 7, 2013
Emissions from high-temperature unrefined rapeseed oil — January 3, 2014
Epichlorohydrin 106-89-8 October 1, 1987
Epoxiconazole 135319-73-2 April 15, 2011
Erionite 12510-42-8/ October 1, 1988

66733-21-9
Estradiol 17B 50-28-2 January 1, 1988
Estragole 140-67-0 October 29, 1999
Estrogens, steroidal — August 19, 2005
Estrogen-progestogen (combined) used as menopausal therapy — November 4, 2011
Estrone 53-16-7 January 1, 1988
Estropipate 7280-37-7 August 26, 1997
Ethanol in alcoholic beverages — April 29, 2011
Ethinylestradiol 57-63-6 January 1, 1988
Ethoprop 13194-48-4 February 27, 2001
Ethyl acrylate 140-88-5 July 1, 1989
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 June 11, 2004
Ethyl methanesulfonate 62-50-0 January 1, 1988
Ethyl-4,4’-dichlorobenzilate 510-15-6 January 1, 1990
Ethylene dibromide 106-93-4 July 1, 1987
Ethylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloroethane) 107-06-2 October 1, 1987
Ethylene oxide 75-21-8 July 1, 1987
Ethylene thiourea 96-45-7 January 1, 1988
Ethyleneimine (Aziridine) 151-56-4 January 1, 1988
Etoposide 33419-42-0 November 4, 2011
Etoposide in combination with cisplatin and bleomycin — November 4, 2011

Fenoxycarb 72490-01-8 June 2, 2000
Folpet 133-07-3 January 1, 1989
Formaldehyde (gas) 50-00-0 January 1, 1988
2-(2-Formylhydrazino)-4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)thiazole 3570-75-0 January 1, 1988
FumonisinB1 116355-83-0 November 14, 2003
Furan 110-00-9 October 1, 1993
Furazolidone 67-45-8 January 1, 1990
Furfuryl alcohol 98-00-0 September 30, 2016
Furmecyclox 60568-05-0 January 1, 1990
Fusarin C 79748-81-5 July 1, 1995

Gallium arsenide 1303-00-0 August 1, 2008
Ganciclovir 82410-32-0 August 26, 1997
Gasoline engine exhaust (condensates/extracts) — October 1, 1990
Gemfibrozil 25812-30-0 December 22, 2000
Glass wool fibers (inhalable and biopersistent) — July 1, 1990
Glu-P-1 (2-Amino-6-methyldipyrido[1,2-

a:3’,2’-d]imidazole) 67730-11-4 January 1, 1990
Glu-P-2 (2-Aminodipyrido[1,2-a: 3’,2’-d]imidazole) 67730-10-3 January 1, 1990
Glycidaldehyde 765-34-4 January 1, 1988
Glycidol 556-52-5 July 1, 1990
Goldenseal root powder December 4, 2015
Griseofulvin 126-07-8 January 1, 1990
Gyromitrin (Acetaldehyde methylformylhydrazone) 16568-02-8 January 1, 1988

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Chemical CAS Number Date

HC Blue 1 2784-94-3 July 1, 1989
Heptachlor 76-44-8 July 1, 1988
Heptachlor epoxide 1024-57-3 July 1, 1988
Herbal remedies containing plant species of the genus Aristolochia — July 9, 2004
Hexachlorobenzene 118-74-1 October 1, 1987
Hexachlorobutadiene 87-68-3 May 3, 2011
Hexachlorocyclohexane (technical grade) — October 1, 1987
Hexachlorodibenzodioxin 34465-46-8 April 1, 1988
Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 July 1, 1990
2,4-Hexadienal (89% trans, trans isomer; 11% cis, trans isomer) — March 4, 2005
Hexamethylphosphoramide 680-31-9 January 1, 1988
Hydrazine 302-01-2 January 1, 1988
Hydrazine sulfate 10034-93-2 January 1, 1988
Hydrazobenzene (1,2-Diphenylhydrazine) 122-66-7 January 1, 1988
1-Hydroxyanthraquinone 129-43-1 May 27, 2005
Imazalil 35554-44-0 May 20, 2011
Indeno [1,2,3-cd]pyrene 193-39-5 January 1, 1988
Indium phosphide 22398-80-7 February 27, 2001
IQ (2-Amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline) 76180-96-6 April 1, 1990
Iprodione 36734-19-7 May 1, 1996
Iprovalicarb 140923-17-7 June 1, 2007

140923-25-7
Iron dextran complex 9004-66-4 January 1, 1988
Isobutyl nitrite 542-56-3 May 1, 1996
Isoprene 78-79-5 May 1, 1996
Isopyrazam 881686-58-1 July 24, 2012
Isosafrole Delisted December 8, 2006 120-58-1 October 1, 1989
Isoxaflutole 141112-29-0 December 22, 2000
Kresoxim-methyl 143390-89-0 February 3, 2012
Lactofen 77501-63-4 January 1, 1989
Lasiocarpine 303-34-4 April 1, 1988
Lead acetate 301-04-2 January 1, 1988
Lead and lead compounds — October 1, 1992
Lead phosphate 7446-27-7 April 1, 1988
Lead subacetate 1335-32-6 October 1, 1989
Leather dust — April 29, 2011
Lindane and other hexachlorocyclohexane isomers — October 1, 1989
Lynestrenol 52-76-6 February 27, 2001
Malathion 121-75-5 May 20, 2016
Malonaldehyde, sodium salt 24382-04-5 May 3, 2011
Mancozeb 8018-01-7 January 1, 1990
Maneb 12427-38-2 January 1, 1990
Marijuana smoke — June 19, 2009
Me-A-alpha-C (2-Amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole) 68006-83-7 January 1, 1990
Medroxyprogesterone acetate 71-58-9 January 1, 1990
Megestrol acetate 595-33-5 March 28, 2014
MeIQ(2-Amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline) 77094-11-2 October 1, 1994
MeIQx(2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline) 77500-04-0 October 1, 1994
Melphalan 148-82-3 February 27, 1987
Mepanipyrin 110235-47-7 July 1, 2008
Merphalan 531-76-0 April 1, 1988
Mestranol 72-33-3 April 1, 1988

1860

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Metam potassium 137-41-7 December 31, 2010
Metham sodium 137-42-8 November 6, 1998
8-Methoxypsoralen with ultraviolet A therapy 298-81-7 February 27, 1987
5-Methoxypsoralen with ultraviolet A therapy 484-20-8 October 1, 1988
2-Methylaziridine (Propyleneimine) 75-55-8 January 1, 1988
Methylazoxymethanol 590-96-5 April 1, 1988
Methylazoxymethanol acetate 592-62-1 April 1, 1988
Methyl carbamate 598-55-0 May 15, 1998
3-Methylcholanthrene 56-49-5 January 1, 1990
5-Methylchrysene 3697-24-3 April 1, 1988
4,4’-Methylene bis(2-chloroaniline) 101-14-4 July 1, 1987
4,4’-Methylene bis(N,N-dimethyl)benzenamine 101-61-1 October 1, 1989
4,4’-Methylene bis(2-methylaniline) 838-88-0 April 1, 1988
4,4’-Methylenedianiline 101-77-9 January 1, 1988
4,4’-Methylenedianiline dihydrochloride 13552-44-8 January 1, 1988
Methyleugenol 93-15-2 November 16, 2001
Methylhydrazine and its salts — July 1, 1992
2-Methylimidazole 693-98-1 June 22, 2012
4-Methylimidazole 822-36-6 January 7, 2011
Methyl iodide 74-88-4 April 1, 1988
Methyl isobutyl ketone 108-10-1 November 4, 2011
Methylmercury compounds — May 1, 1996
Methyl methanesulfonate 66-27-3 April 1, 1988
2-Methyl-1-nitroanthraquinone (of uncertain purity) 129-15-7 April 1, 1988
N-Methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine 70-25-7 April 1, 1988
N-Methylolacrylamide 924-42-5 July 1, 1990
a-Methyl styrene (alpha-Methylstyrene) 98-83-9 November 2, 2012
Methylthiouracil 56-04-2 October 1, 1989
Metiram 9006-42-2 January 1, 1990
Metronidazole 443-48-1 January 1, 1988
Michler’s ketone 90-94-8 January 1, 1988
Mirex 2385-85-5 January 1, 1988
Mitomycin C 50-07-7 April 1, 1988
Mitoxantrone hydrochloride 70476-82-3 January 23, 2015
MON 4660 (dichloroacetyl-1-oxa-4-azaspiro(4,5)-decane) 71526-07-3 March 22, 2011
MON 13900 (furilazole) 121776-33-8 March 22, 2011
3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) 96-24-2 October 8, 2010
Monocrotaline 315-22-0 April 1, 1988
MOPP (vincristine-prednisone-nitrogen mustard-

procarbazine mixture 113803-47-7 November 4, 2011
5-(Morpholinomethyl)-3-[(5-nitro-furfurylidene)-amino]-2-

oxazolidinone 139-91-3 April 1, 1988
Mustard Gas 505-60-2 February 27, 1987
MX (3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone) 77439-76-0 December 22, 2000
beta-Myrcene 123-35-3 March 27, 2015

Nafenopin 3771-19-5 April 1, 1988
Nalidixic acid 389-08-2 May 15, 1998
Naphthalene 91-20-3 April 19, 2002
1-Naphthylamine 134-32-7 October 1, 1989
2-Naphthylamine 91-59-8 February 27, 1987
Nickel (Metallic) 7440-02-0 October 1, 1989
Nickel acetate 373-02-4 October 1, 1989

1861

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Nickel carbonate 3333-67-3 October 1, 1989
Nickel carbonyl 13463-39-3 October 1, 1987
Nickel compounds — May 7, 2004
Nickel hydroxide 12054-48-7; October 1, 1989

12125-56-3
Nickelocene 1271-28-9 October 1, 1989
Nickel oxide 1313-99-1 October 1, 1989
Nickel refinery dust from the pyrometallurgical process — October 1, 1987
Nickel subsulfide 12035-72-2 October 1, 1987
Niridazole 61-57-4 April 1, 1988
Nitrapyrin 1929-82-4 October 5, 2005
Nitrilotriacetic acid 139-13-9 January 1, 1988
Nitrilotriacetic acid, trisodium salt monohydrate 18662-53-8 April 1, 1989
5-Nitroacenaphthene 602-87-9 April 1, 1988
5-Nitro-o-anisidine Delisted December 8, 2006 99-59-2 October 1, 1989
o-Nitroanisole 91-23-6 October 1, 1992
Nitrobenzene 98-95-3 August 26, 1997
4-Nitrobiphenyl 92-93-3 April 1, 1988
6-Nitrochrysene 7496-02-8 October 1, 1990
Nitrofen (technical grade) 1836-75-5 January 1, 1988
2-Nitrofluorene 607-57-8 October 1, 1990
Nitrofurazone 59-87-0 January 1, 1990
1-[(5-Nitrofurfurylidene)-amino]-2-imidazolidinone 555-84-0 April 1, 1988
N-[4-(5-Nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl]acetamide 531-82-8 April 1, 1988
Nitrogen mustard (Mechlorethamine) 51-75-2 January 1, 1988
Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride (Mechlorethamine hydrochloride) 55-86-7 April 1, 1988
Nitrogen mustard N-oxide 126-85-2 April 1, 1988
Nitrogen mustard N-oxide hydrochloride 302-70-5 April 1, 1988
Nitromethane 75-52-5 May 1, 1997
2-Nitropropane 79-46-9 January 1, 1988
1-Nitropyrene 5522-43-0 October 1, 1990
4-Nitropyrene 57835-92-4 October 1, 1990
N-Nitrosodi-n-butylamine 924-16-3 October 1, 1987
N-Nitrosodiethanolamine 1116-54-7 January 1, 1988
N-Nitrosodiethylamine 55-18-5 October 1, 1987
N-Nitrosodimethylamine 62-75-9 October 1, 1987
p-Nitrosodiphenylamine 156-10-5 January 1, 1988
N-Nitrosodiphenylamine 86-30-6 April 1, 1988
N-Nitrosodi-n-propylamine 621-64-7 January 1, 1988
N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea 759-73-9 October 1, 1987
3-(N-Nitrosomethylamino)propionitrile 60153-49-3 April 1, 1990
4-(N-Nitrosomethylamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)1-butanone 64091-91-4 April 1, 1990
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-butylamine 7068-83-9 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-decylamine 75881-22-0 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-dodecylamine 55090-44-3 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethylethylamine 10595-95-6 October 1, 1989
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-heptylamine 16338-99-1 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-hexylamine 28538-70-7 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-nonylamine 75881-19-5 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-octylamine 34423-54-6 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-pentylamine 13256-07-0 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-propylamine 924-46-9 December 26, 2014
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-tetradecylamine 75881-20-8 December 26, 2014

1862

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date
N-Nitrosomethyl-n-undecylamine 68107-26-6 December 26, 2014
N-Nitroso-N-methylurea 684-93-5 October 1, 1987
N-Nitroso-N-methylurethane 615-53-2 April 1, 1988
N-Nitrosomethylvinylamine 4549-40-0 January 1, 1988
N-Nitrosomorpholine 59-89-2 January 1, 1988
N-Nitrosonornicotine 16543-55-8 January 1, 1988
N-Nitrosopiperidine 100-75-4 January 1, 1988
N-Nitrosopyrrolidine 930-55-2 October 1, 1987
N-Nitrososarcosine 13256-22-9 January 1, 1988
o-Nitrotoluene 88-72-2 May 15, 1998
Norethisterone (Norethindrone) 68-22-4 October 1, 1989
Norethynodrel 68-23-5 February 27, 2001

Ochratoxin A 303-47-9 July 1, 1990
Oil Orange SS 2646-17-5 April 1, 1988
Oral contraceptives, combined — October 1, 1989
Oral contraceptives, sequential — October 1, 1989
Oryzalin 19044-88-3 September 12, 2008
Oxadiazon 19666-30-9 July 1, 1991
Oxazepam 604-75-1 October 1, 1994
Oxymetholone 434-07-1 January 1, 1988
Oxythioquinox (Chinomethionat) 2439-01-2 August 20, 1999

Palygorskite fibers (> 5µm in length) 12174-11-7 December 28, 1999
Panfuran S 794-93-4 January 1, 1988
Parathion 56-38-2 May 20, 2016
Pentachlorophenol 87-86-5 January 1, 1990
Pentosan polysulfate sodium — April 18, 2014
Phenacetin 62-44-2 October 1, 1989
Phenazopyridine 94-78-0 January 1, 1988
Phenazopyridine hydrochloride 136-40-3 January 1, 1988
Phenesterin 3546-10-9 July 1, 1989
Phenobarbital 50-06-6 January 1, 1990
Phenolphthalein 77-09-8 May 15, 1998
Phenoxybenzamine 59-96-1 April 1, 1988
Phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride 63-92-3 April 1, 1988
o-Phenylenediamine and its salts 95-54-5 May 15, 1998
Phenyl glycidyl ether 122-60-1 October 1, 1990
Phenylhydrazine and its salts — July 1, 1992
o-Phenylphenate, sodium 132-27-4 January 1, 1990
o-Phenylphenol 90-43-7 August 4, 2000
PhiP(2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazol[4,5-b]pyridine) 105650-23-5 October 1, 1994
Pioglitazone 111025-46-8 April 18, 2014
Pirimicarb 23103-98-2 July 2, 2008
Polybrominated biphenyls — January 1, 1988
Polychlorinated biphenyls — October 1, 1989
Polychlorinated biphenyls (containing 60 or more percent chlorine by

molecular weight) — January 1, 1988
Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins — October 1, 1992
Polychlorinated dibenzofurans — October 1, 1992
Polygeenan 53973-98-1 January 1, 1988
Ponceau MX 3761-53-3 April 1, 1988
Ponceau 3R 3564-09-8 April 1, 1988
Potassium bromate 7758-01-2 January 1, 1990

1863

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Primidone 125-33-7 August 20, 1999
Procarbazine 671-16-9 January 1, 1988
Procarbazine hydrochloride 366-70-1 January 1, 1988
Procymidone 32809-16-8 October 1, 1994
Progesterone 57-83-0 January 1, 1988
Pronamide 23950-58-5 May 1, 1996
Propachlor 1918-16-7 February 27, 2001
d1,3-Propane sultone 1120-71-4 January 1, 1988
Propargite 2312-35-8 October 1, 1994
beta-Propiolactone 57-57-8 January 1, 1988
Propoxur 114-26-1 August 11, 2006
Propylene glycol mono-t-butyl ether 57018-52-7 June 11, 2004
Propylene oxide 75-56-9 October 1, 1988
Propylthiouracil 51-52-5 January 1, 1988
Pulegone 89-82-7 April 18, 2014
Pymetrozine 123312-89-0 March 22, 2011
Pyridine 110-86-1 May 17, 2002

Quinoline and its strong acid salts — October 24, 1997
Radionuclides — July 1, 1989
Reserpine 50-55-5 October 1, 1989
Residual (heavy) fuel oils — October 1, 1990

Resmethrin 10453-86-8 July 1, 2008
Riddelliine 23246-96-0 December 3, 2004
Saccharin Delisted April 6, 2001 81-07-2 October 1, 1989

Saccharin, sodium Delisted January 17, 2003 128-44-9 January 1, 1988
Safrole 94-59-7 January 1, 1988
Salted fish, Chinese-style — April 29, 2011
Sedaxane 874967-67-6 July 1, 2016
Selenium sulfide 7446-34-6 October 1, 1989
Shale-oils 68308-34-9 April 1, 1990
Silica, crystalline (airborne particles of respirable size) — October 1, 1988
Soots, tars, and mineral oils (untreated and mildly treated oils

and used engine oils) — February 27, 1987
Spirodiclofen 148477-71-8 October 8, 2010
Spironolactone 52-01-7 May 1, 1997
Stanozolol 10418-03-8 May 1, 1997
Sterigmatocystin 10048-13-2 April 1, 1988
Streptozotocin (streptozocin) 18883-66-4 January 1, 1988
Strong inorganic acid mists containing sulfuric acid — March 14, 2003
Styrene 100-42-5 April 22, 2016
Styrene oxide 96-09-3 October 1, 1988
Sulfallate 95-06-7 January 1, 1988
Sulfasalazine (Salicylazosulfapyridine) 599-79-1 May 15, 1998

Talc containing asbestiform fibers — April 1, 1990
Tamoxifen and its salts 10540-29-1 September 1, 1996
Teriparatide 52232-67-4 August 14, 2015
Terrazole 2593-15-9 October 1, 1994
Testosterone and its esters 58-22-0 April 1, 1988
3,3’,4,4’-Tetrachloroazobenzene 14047-09-7 July 24, 2012
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) 1746-01-6 January 1, 1988
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane 630-20-6 September 13, 2013
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 79-34-5 July 1, 1990

1864

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127-18-4 April 1, 1988
p-a,a,a-Tetrachlorotoluene 5216-25-1 January 1, 1990
Tetrachlorvinphos 22248-79-9 May 20, 2016
Tetrafluoroethylene 116-14-3 May 1, 1997
Tetranitromethane 509-14-8 July 1, 1990
Thioacetamide 62-55-5 January 1, 1988
4,4’-Thiodianiline 139-65-1 April 1, 1988
Thiodicarb 59669-26-0 August 20, 1999
Thiouracil 141-90-2 June 11, 2004
Thiourea 62-56-6 January 1, 1988
Thorium dioxide 1314-20-1 February 27, 1987
Titanium dioxide (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size) — September 2, 2011
Tobacco, oral use of smokeless products — April 1, 1988
Tobacco smoke — April 1, 1988
Toluene diisocyanate 26471-62-5 October 1, 1989
ortho-Toluidine 95-53-4 January 1, 1988
ortho-Toluidine hydrochloride 636-21-5 January 1, 1988
para Toluidine Delisted October 29, 1999 106-49-0 January 1, 1990
Toxaphene (Polychlorinated camphenes) 8001-35-2 January 1, 1988
Toxins derived from Fusarium moniliforme

(Fusarium verticillioides) — August 7, 2009
Treosulfan 299-75-2 February 27, 1987
Triamterene 396-01-0 April 18, 2014
S,S,S-Tributyl phosphorotrithioate (Tribufos, DEF) 78-48-8 February 25, 2011
Trichlormethine (Trimustine hydrochloride) 817-09-4 January 1, 1992
Trichloroacetic acid 76-03-9 September 13, 2013
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 April 1, 1988
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol 88-06-2 January 1, 1988
1,2,3-Trichloropropane 96-18-4 October 1, 1992
Trimethyl phosphate 512-56-1 May 1, 1996
2,4,5-Trimethylaniline and its strong acid salts — October 24, 1997
2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) 118-96-7 December 19, 2008
Triphenyltin hydroxide 76-87-9 July 1, 1992
Tris(aziridinyl)-para-benzoquinone (Triaziquone) 68-76-8 October 1, 1989

Delisted December 8, 2006
Tris(1-aziridinyl)phosphine sulfide (Thiotepa) 52-24-4 January 1, 1988
Tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate 115-96-8 April 1, 1992
Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate 126-72-7 January 1, 1988
Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) 13674-87-8 October 28, 2011
Trp-P-1 (Tryptophan-P-1) 62450-06-0 April 1, 1988
Trp-P-2 (Tryptophan-P-2) 62450-07-1 April 1, 1988
Trypan blue (commercial grade) 72-57-1 October 1, 1989

Unleaded gasoline (wholly vaporized) — April 1, 1988
Uracil mustard 66-75-1 April 1, 1988
Urethane (Ethyl carbamate) 51-79-6 January 1, 1988

Vanadium pentoxide (orthorhombic crystalline form) 1314-62-1 February 11, 2005
Vinclozolin 50471-44-8 August 20, 1999
Vinyl bromide 593-60-2 October 1, 1988
Vinyl chloride 75-01-4 February 27, 1987
4-Vinylcyclohexene 100-40-3 May 1, 1996
4-Vinyl-1-cyclohexene diepoxide (Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide) 106-87-6 July 1, 1990
Vinyl fluoride 75-02-5 May 1, 1997
Vinyl trichloride (1,1,2-Trichloroethane) 79-00-5 October 1, 1990

1865

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Chemical CAS Number Date

Wood dust — December 18, 2009

2,6-Xylidine (2,6-Dimethylaniline) 87-62-7 January 1, 1991

Zalcitabine 7481-89-2 August 7, 2009
Zidovudine (AZT) 30516-87-1 December 18, 2009
Zileuton 111406-87-2 December 22, 2000
Zineb Delisted October 29, 1999 12122-67-7 January 1, 1990

CHEMICALS KNOWN TO THE STATE TO CAUSE REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY

Type of
Chemical Reproductive Toxicity CAS No. Date Listed
Abiraterone acetate developmental, female, male 154229-18-2 April 8, 2016
Acetazolamide developmental 59-66-5 August 20, 1999
Acetohydroxamic acid developmental 546-88-3 April 1, 1990
Acrylamide developmental, male 79-06-1 February 25, 2011
Actinomycin D developmental 50-76-0 October 1, 1992
All-trans retinoic acid developmental 302-79-4 January 1, 1989
Alprazolam developmental 28981-97-7 July 1, 1990
Altretamine developmental, male 645-05-6 August 20, 1999
Amantadine hydrochloride developmental 665-66-7 February 27, 2001
Amikacin sulfate developmental 39831-55-5 July 1, 1990
Aminoglutethimide developmental 125-84-8 July 1, 1990
tert-Amyl methyl ether developmental 994-05-8 December 18, 2009

Delisted December 13, 2013
Aminoglycosides developmental — October 1, 1992
Aminopterin developmental, female 54-62-6 July 1, 1987
Amiodarone hydrochloride developmental, female, male 19774-82-4 August 26, 1997
Amitraz developmental 33089-61-1 March 30, 1999
Amoxapine developmental 14028-44-5 May 15, 1998
Anabolic steroids female, male — April 1, 1990
Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

inhibitors developmental — October 1, 1992
Anisindione developmental 117-37-3 October 1, 1992
Arsenic (inorganic oxides) developmental — May 1, 1997
Aspirin (NOTE: It is especially important developmental, female 50-78-2 July 1, 1990

not to use aspirin during the last three

months of pregnancy, unless specifically

directed to do so by a physician because

it may cause problems in the unborn child or

complications during delivery.)
Atenolol developmental 29122-68-7 August 26, 1997
Atrazine developmental, female 1912-24-9 July 15, 2016
Auranofin developmental 34031-32-8 January 29, 1999
Avermectin B1 (Abamectin) developmental 71751-41-2 December 3, 2010
Azathioprine developmental 446-86-6 September 1, 1996

Barbiturates developmental — October 1, 1992
Beclomethasone dipropionate developmental 5534-09-8 May 15, 1998
Benomyl developmental, male 17804-35-2 July 1, 1991
Benzene developmental, male 71-43-2 December 26, 1997
Benzodiazepines developmental — October 1, 1992
Benzphetamine hydrochloride developmental 5411-22-3 April 1, 1990

1866

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Type of
Chemical Reproductive Toxicity CAS No. Date Listed
Bischloroethyl nitrosourea developmental 154-93-8 July 1, 1990
(BCNU) (Carmustine)
Bisphenol A (BPA) female 80-05-7 May 11, 2015
Bisphenol A (BPA) developmental 80-05-7 April 11, 2013
Delisted April 19, 2013
Bromacil lithium salt developmental 53404-19-6 May 18, 1999
male January 17, 2003
1-Bromopropane developmental, female, male 106-94-5 December 7, 2004
2-Bromopropane female, male 75-26-3 May 31, 2005
Bromoxynil developmental 1689-84-5 October 1, 1990
Bromoxynil octanoate developmental 1689-99-2 May 18, 1999
Butabarbital sodium developmental 143-81-7 October 1, 1992
1,3-Butadiene developmental, female, male 106-99-0 April 16, 2004
1,4-Butanediol dimethane-sulfonate developmental 55-98-1 January 1, 1989
(Busulfan)
Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) developmental 85-68-7 December 2, 2005
n-Butyl glycidyl ether male 2426-08-6 August 7, 2009
Delisted April 4, 2014
Cadmium developmental, male — May 1, 1997
Carbamazepine developmental 298-46-4 January 29, 1999
Carbaryl developmental, female, male 63-25.2 August 7, 2009
Carbon disulfide developmental, female, male 75-15-0 July 1, 1989
Carbon monoxide developmental 630-08-0 July 1, 1989
Carboplatin developmental 41575-94-4 July 1, 1990
Chenodiol developmental 474-25-9 April 1, 1990
Chlorambucil developmental 305-03-3 January 1, 1989
Chlorcyclizine hydrochloride developmental 1620-21-9 July 1, 1987
Chlordecone (Kepone) developmental 143-50-0 January 1, 1989
Chlordiazepoxide developmental 58-25-3 January 1, 1992
Chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride developmental 438-41-5 January 1, 1992
1-(2-Chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1- developmental 13010-47-4 July 1, 1990
nitrosourea (CCNU) (Lomustine)
Chloroform developmental 67-66-3 August 7, 2009
2-Chloropropionic acid male 598-78-7 August 7, 2009
Chlorsulfuron developmental, female, male 64902-72-3 May 14, 1999
Delisted June 6, 2014
Chromium (hexavalent compounds) developmental, female, male — December 19, 2008
Cidofovir developmental, female, male 113852-37-2 January 29, 1999
Cladribine developmental 4291-63-8 September 1, 1996
Clarithromycin developmental 81103-11-9 May 1, 1997
Clobetasol propionate developmental, female 25122-46-7 May 15, 1998
Clomiphene citrate developmental 50-41-9 April 1, 1990
Clorazepate dipotassium developmental 57109-90-7 October 1, 1992
Cocalne developmental, female 50-36-2 July 1, 1989
Codeine phosphate developmental 52-28-8 May 15, 1998
Colchicine developmental, male 64-86-8 October 1, 1992
Conjugated estrogens developmental — April 1, 1990
Cyanazine developmental 21725-46-2 April 1, 1990
Cycloate developmental 1134-23-2 March 19, 1999
Cyclohexanol male 108-93-0 November 6, 1998
Delisted January 25, 2002

1867

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Type of
Chemical Reproductive Toxicity CAS No. Date Listed
Cycloheximide developmental 66-81-9 January 1, 1989
Cyclophosphamide (anhydrous) developmental, female, male 50-18-0 January 1, 1989
Cyclophosphamide (hydrated) developmental, female, male 6055-19-2 January 1, 1989
Cyhexatin developmental 13121-70-5 January 1, 1989
Cytarabine developmental 147-94-4 January 1, 1989

Dacarbazine developmental 4342-03-4 January 29, 1999
Danazol developmental 17230-88-5 April 1, 1990
Daunorubicin hydrochloride developmental 23541-50-6 July 1, 1990
2,4-D butyric acid developmental, male 94-82-6 June 18, 1999
o,p’-DDT developmental, female, male 789-02-6 May 15, 1998
p,p’-DDT developmental, female, male 50-29-3 May 15, 1998
Demeclocycline hydrochloride developmental 64-73-3 January 1, 1992

(internal use)
Des-ethyl atrazine (DEA) developmental, female 6190-65-4 July 15, 2016
Des-isopropyl atrazine (DIA) developmental, female 1007-28-9 July 15, 2016
2,4-Diamino-6-chloro-s-

triazine (DACT) developmental, female 3397-62-4 July 15, 2016
Diazepam developmental 439-14-5 January 1, 1992
Diazoxide developmental 364-98-7 February 27, 2001
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) male 96-12-8 February 27, 1987
Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) developmental, female, male 84-74-2 December 2, 2005
Dichloroacetic acid developmental, male 79-43-6 August 7, 2009
1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) developmental, male 72-55-9 March 30, 2010

ethylene (DDE)
Dichlorophene developmental 97-23-4 April 27, 1999
Dichlorphenamide developmental 120-97-8 February 27, 2001
Diclofop methyl developmental 51338-27-3 March 5, 1999
Dicumarol developmental 66-76-2 October 1, 1992
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) developmental, male 117-81-7 October 24, 2003
Diethylstilbestrol (DES) developmental 56-53-1 July 1, 1987
Diflunisal developmental, female 22494-42-4 January 29, 1999
Diglycidyl ether male 2238-07-5 August 7, 2009

Delisted April 4, 2014
Di-n-hexyl phthalate (DnHP) female, male 84-75-3 December 2, 2005
Dihydroergotamine mesylate developmental 6190-39-2 May 1, 1997
Di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP) developmental 68515-49-1/ April 20, 2007

26761-40-0
Diltiazem hydrochloride developmental 33286-22-5 February 27, 2001
N,N-Dimethylacetamide developmental, male 127-19-5 May 21, 2010
m-Dinitrobenzene male 99-65-0 July 1, 1990
o-Dinitrobenzene male 528-29-0 July 1, 1990
p-Dinitrobenzene male 100-25-4 July 1, 1990
2,4-Dinitrotoluene male 121-14-2 August 20, 1999
2,6-Dinitrotoluene male 606-20-2 August 20, 1999
Dinitrotoluene (technical grade) female, male — August 20, 1999
Dinocap developmental 39300-45-3 April 1, 1990
Dinoseb developmental, male 88-85-7 January 1, 1989
Diphenylhydantoin (Phenytoin) developmental 57-41-0 July 1, 1987
Disodium cyanodithioimidocarbonate developmental 138-93-2 March 30, 1999
Doxorubicin hydrochloride developmental, male 25316-40-9 January 29, 1999

(Adriamycin)

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Type of
Chemical Reproductive Toxicity CAS No. Date Listed
Doxycycline (internal use) developmental 564-25-0 July 1, 1990
Doxycycline calcium (internal use) developmental 94088-85-4 January 1, 1992
Doxycycline hyclate (internal use) developmental 24390-14-5 October 1, 1991
Doxycycline monohydrate developmental 17086-28-1 October 1, 1991

(internal use)
2,4 DP (dichloroprop) developmental 120-36-5 April 27, 1999

Delisted January 25, 2002

Endrin developmental 72-20-8 May 15, 1998
Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) developmental — June 9, 2006
Epichlorohydrin male 106-89-8 September 1, 1996
Ergotamine tartrate developmental 379-79-3 April 1, 1990
Estropipate developmental 7280-37-7 August 26, 1997
Ethionamide developmental 536-33-4 August 26, 1997
Ethyl alcohol in alcoholic beverages developmental — October 1, 1987
Ethyl-tert-butyl ether male 637-92-3 December 18, 2009

Delisted December 13, 2013
Ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate developmental 759-94-4 April 27, 1999
Ethylene dibromide developmental, male 106-93-4 May 15, 1998
Ethylene glycol (ingested) developmental 107-21-1 June 19, 2015
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether developmental, male 110-80-5 January 1, 1989
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether developmental, male 109-86-4 January 1, 1989
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate developmental, male 111-15-9 January 1, 1993
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate developmental, male 110-49-6 January 1, 1993
Ethylene oxide female 75-21-8 February 27, 1987

developmental, male August 7, 2009
Ethylene thiourea developmental 96-45-7 January 1, 1993
2-Ethylhexanoic acid developmental 149-57-5 August 7, 2009

Delisted December 13, 2013
Etodolac developmental, female 41340-25-4 August 20, 1999
Etoposide developmental 33419-42-0 July 1, 1990
Etretinate developmental 54350-48-0 July 1, 1987

Fenoxaprop ethyl developmental 66441-23-4 March 26, 1999
Filgrastim developmental 121181-53-1 February 27, 2001
Fluazifop butyl developmental 69806-50-4 November 6, 1998
Flunisolide developmental, female 3385-03-3 May 15, 1998
Fluorouracil developmental 51-21-8 January 1, 1989
Fluoxymesterone developmental 76-43-7 April 1, 1990
Flurazepam hydrochloride developmental 1172-18-5 October 1, 1992
Flurbiprofen developmental, female 5104-49-4 August 20, 1999
HFlutamide developmental 13311-84-7 July 1, 1990
Fluticasone propionate developmental 80474-14-2 May 15, 1998
Fluvalinate developmental 69409-94-5 November 6, 1998

Ganciclovir developmental, male 82410-32-0 August 26, 1997
Ganciclovir sodium developmental, male 107910-75-8 August 26, 1997
Gemfibrozil female, male 25812-30-0 August 20, 1999
Goserelin acetate developmental, female, male 65807-02-5 August 26, 1997

Halazepam developmental 23092-17-3 July 1, 1990
Halobetasol propionate developmental 66852-54-8 August 20, 1999
aloperidol developmental, female 52-86-8 January 29, 1999
Halothane developmental 151-67-7 September 1, 1996
Heptachlor developmental 76-44-8 August 20, 1999

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Type of
Chemical Reproductive Toxicity CAS No. Date Listed
Hexachlorobenzene developmental 118-74-1 January 1, 1989
Hexafluoroacetone developmental, male 684-16-2 August 1, 2008
LHexamethylphosphoramide male 680-31-9 October 1, 1994
2,5-Hexanedione male 110-13-4 December 4, 2015
Histrelin acetate developmental — May 15, 1998
Hydramethylnon developmental, male 67485-29-4 March 5, 1999
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) male — July 5, 2013

and cyanide salts (CN salts)
Hydroxyurea developmental 127-07-1 May 1, 1997
Idarubicin hydrochloride developmental, male 57852-57-0 August 20, 1999
Ifosfamide developmental 3778-73-2 July 1, 1990
Iodine-131 developmental 10043-66-0 January 1, 1989
Isotretinoin developmental 4759-48-2 July 1, 1987

Lead developmental, female, male — February 27, 1987
Leuprolide acetate developmental, female, male 74381-53-6 August 26, 1997
Levodopa developmental 59-92-7 January 29, 1999
Levonorgestrel implants female 797-63-7 May 15, 1998
Linuron developmental 330-55-2 March 19, 1999
Lithium carbonate developmental 554-13-2 January 1, 1991
Lithium citrate developmental 919-16-4 January 1, 1991
Lorazepam developmental 846-49-1 July 1, 1990
Lovastatin developmental 75330-75-5 October 1, 1992

Mebendazole developmental 31431-39-7 August 20, 1999
Medroxyprogesterone acetate developmental 71-58-9 April 1, 1990
Megestrol acetate developmental 595-33-5 January 1, 1991
Melphalan developmental 148-82-3 July 1, 1990
Menotropins developmental 9002-68-0 April 1, 1990
Meprobamate developmental 57-53-4 January 1, 1992
Mercaptopurine developmental 6112-76-1 July 1, 1990
Mercury and mercury compounds developmental — July 1, 1990
Methacycline hydrochloride developmental 3963-95-9 January 1, 1991
Metham sodium developmental 137-42-8 May 15, 1998
Methanol developmental 67-56-1 March 16, 2012
Methazole developmental 20354-26-1 December 1, 1999
Methimazole developmental 60-56-0 July 1, 1990
Methotrexate developmental 59-05-2 January 1, 1989
Methotrexate sodium developmental 15475-56-6 April 1, 1990
Methyl bromide as a structural fumigant developmental 74-83-9 January 1, 1993
Methyln-n-butyl ketone developmental 591-78-6 December 4, 2015

male August 7, 2009
Methyl chloride developmental 74-87-3 March 10, 2000

male August 7, 2009
Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) developmental 108-10-1 March 28, 2014
Methyl isocyanate (MIC) developmental, female 624-83-9 November 12, 2010
Methyl isopropyl ketone developmental 563-80-4 February 17, 2012

Delisted April 4, 2014
Methyl mercury developmental — July 1, 1987
N-Methylpyrrolidone developmental 872-50-4 June 15, 2001

a-Methyl styrene female 98-83-9 July 29, 2011
Delisted April 4, 2014

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Type of
Chemical Reproductive Toxicity CAS No. Date Listed
Methyltestosterone developmental 58-18-4 April 1, 1990
Metiram developmental 9006-42-2 March 30, 1999
Midazolam hydrochloride developmental 59467-96-8 July 1, 1990
Minocycline hydrochloride developmental 13614-98-7 January 1, 1992
(internal use)
Misoprostol developmental 59122-46-2 April 1, 1990
Mitoxantrone hydrochloride developmental 70476-82-3 July 1, 1990
Molinate developmental, female, male 2212-67-1 December 11, 2009
Myclobutanil developmental, male 88671-89-0 April 16, 1999
Nabam developmental 142-59-6 March 30, 1999
Nafarelin acetate developmental 86220-42-0 April 1, 1990
Neomycin sulfate (internal use) developmental 1405-10-3 October 1, 1992
Netilmicin sulfate developmental 56391-57-2 July 1, 1990
Nickel carbonyl developmental 13463-39-3 September 1, 1996
Nicotine developmental 54-11-5 April 1, 1990
Nifedipine developmental, female, male 21829-25-4 January 29, 1999
Nimodipine developmental 66085-59-4 April 24, 2001
Nitrapyrin developmental 1929-82-4 March 30, 1999
Nitrobenzene male 98-95-3 March 30, 2010
Nitrofurantoin male 67-20-9 April 1, 1991
Nitrogen mustard (Mechlorethamine) developmental 51-75-2 January 1, 1989
Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride developmental 55-86-7 July 1, 1990
(Mechlorethamine hydrochloride)
Nitrous oxide developmental, female 10024-97-2 August 1, 2008
Norethisterone (Norethindrone) developmental 68-22-4 April 1, 1990
Norethisterone acetate developmental 51-98-9 October 1, 1991
(Norethindrone acetate)
Norethisterone (Norethindrone)/ developmental 68-22-4/ April 1, 1990
Ethinyl estradiol 57-63-6
Norethisterone (Norethindrone)/Mestranol developmental 68-22-4/ April 1, 1990
72-33-3
Norgestrel developmental 6533-00-2 April 1, 1990
Oxadiazon developmental 19666-30-9 May 15, 1998
Oxazepam developmental 604-75-1 October 1, 1992
p,p’-Oxybis(benzenesulfonyl hydrazide) developmental 80-51-3 August 7, 2009
Delisted December 13, 2013
Oxydemeton methyl female, male 301-12-2 November 6, 1998
Oxymetholone developmental 434-07-1 May 1, 1997
Oxytetracycline (internal use) developmental 79-57-2 January 1, 1991
Oxytetracycline hydrochloride developmental 2058-46-0 October 1, 1991
(internal use)
Oxythioquinox (Chinomethionat) developmental 2439-01-2 November 6, 1998
Paclitaxel developmental, female, male 33069-62-4 August 26, 1997
Paramethadione developmental 115-67-3 July 1, 1990
Penicillamine developmental 52-67-5 January 1, 1991
Pentobarbital sodium developmental 57-33-0 July 1, 1990
Pentostatin developmental 53910-25-1 September 1, 1996
Phenacemide developmental 63-98-9 July 1, 1990
Phenprocoumon developmental 435-97-2 October 1, 1992

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
Type of
Chemical Reproductive Toxicity CAS No.Date Listed
Phenyl glycidyl ether male 122-60-1 August 7, 2009

Delisted April 4, 2014
Phenylphosphine developmental male 638-21-1 August 7, 2009
Pimozide developmental, female 2062-78-4 August 20, 1999
Pipobroman developmental 54-91-1 July 1, 1990
Plicamycin developmental 18378-89-7 April 1, 1990
Polybrominated biphenyls developmental — October 1, 1994
Polychlorinated biphenyls developmental — January 1, 1991
Potassium dimethyldithiocarbamate developmental 128-03-0 March 30, 1999
Pravastatin sodium developmental 81131-70-6 March 3, 2000
Prednisolone sodium phosphate developmental 125-02-0 August 20, 1999
Procarbazine hydrochloride developmental 366-70-1 July 1, 1990
Propargite developmental 2312-35-8 June 15, 1999
Propazine developmental, female 139-40-2 July 15, 2016
Propylthiouracil developmental 51-52-5 July 1, 1990
Pyrimethalmine developmental 58-14-0 January 29, 1999

Quazepam developmental 36735-22-5 August 26, 1997

Quizalofop-ethyl male 76578-14-8 December 24, 1999
Resmethrin developmental 10453-86-8 November 6, 1998
Retinol/retinyl esters, when in daily developmental — July 1, 1989

dosages in excess of 10,000 IU, or 3,000

retinol equivalents. (NOTE: Retinol/

retinyl esters are required and essential

for maintenance of normal reproductive

function. The recommended daily level

during pregnancy is 8,000 IU.)
Ribavirin developmental 36791-04-5 April 1, 1990

male 36791-04-5 February 27, 2001
Rifampin developmental, female 13292-46-1 February 27, 2001
Secobarbital sodium developmental 309-43-3 October 1, 1992
Sermorelin acetate developmental — August 20, 1999
Simazine developmental, female 122-34-9 July 15, 2016
Sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate developmental 128-04-1 March 30 1999
Sodium fluoroacetate male 62-74-8 November 6, 1998
Streptomycin sulfate developmental 3810-74-0 January 1, 1991
Streptozocin (streptozotocin) developmental, female, male 18883-66-4 August 20, 1999
Sulfasalazine (Salicylazosulfapyridine) male 599-79-1 January 29, 1999
Sulfur dioxide developmental 7446-09-5 July 29, 2011
Sulindac developmental, female 38194-50-2 January 29, 1999

Tamoxifen citrate developmental 54965-24-1 July 1, 1990
Temazepam developmental 846-50-4 April 1, 1990
Teniposide developmental 29767-20-2 September 1, 1996
Terbacil developmental 5902-51-2 May 18, 1999
Testosterone cypionate developmental 58-20-8 October 1, 1991
Testosterone enanthate developmental 315-37-7 April 1, 1990
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin developmental 1746-01-6 April 1, 1991

(TCDD)
Tetracycline (internal use) developmental 60-54-8 October 1, 1991
Tetracyclines (internal use) developmental — October 1, 1992
Tetracycline hydrochloride developmental 64-75-5 January 1, 1991

(internal use)

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Type of
Chemical Reproductive Toxicity CAS No. Date Listed
Thalidomide developmental 50-35-1 July 1, 1987
Thioguanine developmental 154-42-7 July 1, 1990
Thiophanate methyl female, male 23564-05-8 May 18, 1999
Tobacco smoke (primary) developmental, female, male — April 1, 1988
Tobramycin sulfate developmental 49842-07-1 July 1, 1990
Toluene developmental 108-88-3 January 1, 1991

female August 7, 2009
Topiramate developmental 97240-79-4 November 27, 2015
Triadimefon developmental, female, male 43121-43-3 March 30, 1999
Triazolam developmental 28911-01-5 April 1, 1990
Tributyltin methacrylate developmental 2155-70-6 December 1, 1999
Trichloroethylene developmental, male 79-01-6 January 31, 2014
Trientine hydrochloride developmental 38260-01-4 February 27, 2001
Triforine developmental 26644-46-2 June 18, 1999
1,3,5-Triglycidyl-s-triazinetrione male 2451-62-9 August 7, 2009

Delisted December 13, 2013
Trilostane developmental 13647-35-3 April 1, 1990
Trimethadione developmental 127-48-0 January 1, 1991
Trimetrexate glucuronate developmental 82952-64-5 August 26, 1997
Triphenyltin hydroxide developmental 76-87-9 March 18, 2002

Uracil mustard developmental, female, male 66-75-1 January 1, 1999
Urethane developmental 51-79-6 October 1, 1994
Urofollitropin developmental 97048-13-0 April 1, 1990

Valproate (Valproic acid) developmental 99-66-1 July 1, 1987
Vinblastine sulfate developmental 143-67-9 July 1, 1990
Vinclozolin developmental 50471-44-8 May 15, 1998
Vincristine sulfate developmental 2068-78-2 July 1, 1990
4-Vinylcyclohexene female, male 100-40-03 August 7, 2009
Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide female, male 106-87-6 August 1, 2008

(4-Vinyl-1-cyclohexene diepoxide)

Warfarin developmental 81-81-2 July 1, 1987

Zileuton developmental, female 111406-87-2 December 22, 2000

Date: September 30, 2016

1873

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
OAL REGULATORY
DETERMINATION
OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
DETERMINATION OF ALLEGED
UNDERGROUND REGULATION
(Summary Disposition)
(Pursuant to Government Code Section 11340.5
and
Title 1, section 270, of the
California Code of Regulations)
The attachments are not being printed for practical
reasons or space considerations. However, if you
would like to view the attachments please contact
Margaret Molina at (916) 324-6044 or
mmolina@oal.ca.gov.

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS AND

REHABILITATION
Date: October 3, 2016
To: Mark Steward
From: Chapter Two Compliance Unit
Subject: 2016 OAL DETERMINATION
NO. 4 (S)
(CTU2016-0802-01)
(Summary Disposition issued
pursuant to Gov. Code, sec.
11340.5; Cal. Code Regs., tit. 1,
sec. 270(f))
Petition challenging the California
Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation (CDCR) Folsom
State Prison DOM Supplement,
Section 101040.50, titled
“Recreational Activities,” as an
underground regulation.

On 8/2/2016, the Office of Administrative Law
(OAL) received your petition asking for a determination
as to whether Folsom State Prison Department Operations
Manual (DOM) Supplement Section
101040.50 “Recreational Activities” constitutes an underground
regulation. Folsom State Prison is an institution
under the jurisdiction of the California Department
of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). The rule is
in the Folsom State Prison DOM Supplement dated
June 2016. Folsom State Prison DOM Supplement Section
101040.50 “Recreational Activities” was issued by

the warden at the Folsom State Prison and is attached
hereto as Exhibit A.

In issuing a determination, OAL renders an opinion
only as to whether a challenged rule is a “regulation” as
defined in Government Code section 11342.600,1
which should have been, but was not adopted pursuant
to the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).2 Nothing
in this analysis evaluates the advisability or the wisdom
of the underlying action or enactment. OAL has neither
the legal authority nor the technical expertise to evaluate
the underlying policy issues involved in the subject
of this determination.

Generally, a rule which meets the definition of a “regulation”
in Government Code section 11342.600 is required
to be adopted pursuant to the APA. In some cases,
however, the Legislature has chosen to establish exemptions
from the requirements of the APA. Penal
Code section 5058, subdivision (c), establishes exemptions
expressly for the California Department of Corrections
and Rehabilitation (CDCR):

(c) The following are deemed not to be
“regulations” as defined in Section 11342.600 of
the Government Code:
(1) Rules issued by the director applying
solely to a particular prison or other
correctional facility….
This exemption is called the “local rule” exemption.
It applies only when a rule is established for a single correctional
institution.

In In re Garcia (67 Cal. App.4th 841, 845), the court
discussed the nature of a “local rule” adopted by the
warden for the Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility
(Donovan) which dealt with correspondence between
inmates at Donovan:

The Donovan inter-institutional correspondence

policy applies solely to correspondence entering

or leaving Donovan. It applies to Donovan

inmates in all instances.

1“Regulation” means every rule, regulation, order, or standard of

general application or the amendment, supplement, or revision of

any rule, regulation, order, or standard adopted by any state

agency to implement, interpret, or make specific the law enforced

or administered by it, or to govern its procedure.

2 Such a rule is called an “underground regulation” as defined in

California Code of Regulations, title 1, section 250, subsection

(a):

“Underground regulation” means any guideline, criterion, bul
letin, manual, instruction, order, standard of general applica
tion, or other rule, including a rule governing a state agency

procedure, that is a regulation as defined in section 11342.600

of the Government Code, but has not been adopted as a regula
tion and filed with the Secretary of State pursuant to the APA

and is not subject to an express statutory exemption from adop
tion pursuant to the APA.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
The Donovan policy is not a rule of general
application. It applies solely to Donovan and,
under Penal Code section 5058, subdivision
(c)(1), is not subject to APA requirements.

Similarly, the rule challenged by your petition was issued
by R.J. Rackley, Warden and L. Cahayla, Associate
Warden Programs, and applies solely to the inmates
of the Folsom State Prison. Inmates housed at
other institutions are governed by those other institutions’
criteria for access to yards for recreational activities.
Therefore, the rule is a “local rule” and is exempt
from compliance with the APA pursuant to Penal Code
section 5058(c)(1). It is not an underground regulation.3

The issuance of this summary disposition does not restrict
your right to adjudicate the alleged violation of
section 11340.5 of the Government Code.

/s/
Debra M. Cornez
Director

/s/
Elizabeth A. Heidig
Assistant Chief Counsel

Copy: Scott Kerman, Secretary
Tim Lockwood, Chief, Regulation and Policy
Management Branch

3 The rule challenged by your petition is the proper subject of a
summary disposition letter pursuant to title 1, section 270 of the
California Code of Regulations. Subdivision (f) of section 270
provides:

(f)(1) If facts presented in the petition or obtained by OAL during
its review pursuant to subsection (b) demonstrate to OAL
that the rule challenged by the petition is not an underground
regulation, OAL may issue a summary disposition letter stating
that conclusion. A summary disposition letter may not be
issued to conclude that a challenged rule is an underground
regulation.

(2) Circumstances in which facts demonstrate that the rule
challenged by the petition is not an underground regulation include,
but are not limited to, the following:
(A) The challenged rule has been superseded.
(B) The challenged rule is contained in a California statute.
(C) The challenged rule is contained in a regulation that has
been adopted pursuant to the rulemaking provisions of the
APA.
(D) The challenged rule has expired by its own terms.
(E) An express statutory exemption from the rulemaking
provisions of the APA is applicable to the challenged rule.[Emphasis added.]

RULEMAKING PETITION
DECISION
BOARD OF PAROLE HEARINGS

RESPONSE TO PETITION TO ADOPT,
AMEND, OR REPEAL A REGULATION
PURSUANT TO GOVERNMENT CODE
SECTIONS 11340.6 AND 11340.7
BPH PETITION RESPONSE 2016-04
The Board of Parole Hearings (board) received a Petition
to Adopt, Amend, or Repeal a Regulation under
Government Code sections 11340.6 and 11340.7 from
petitioner William Vogel on August 30, 2016. In accordance
with subdivision (a) of section 11340.7, this document
serves as the board’s response to the petition.

The following information is provided with the response
in compliance with subdivision (d) of Government
Code section 11340.7:

1. NAME OF AGENCY: Board of Parole Hearings
2. PARTY SUBMITTING THE PETITION:
William Vogel (P88353)
3. PROVISIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA CODE
OF REGULATIONS (CCR) REQUESTED TO BE
AFFECTED: Petitioner requested the board to repeal
the California Code of Regulations, Title 15, sections
2281, 2402, 2403, 2422, 2423, 2431, 2432, and 2433.
4. REFERENCE TO AUTHORITY TO TAKE
THE ACTION: Petitioner cited to Penal Code section
1170.2, Penal Code section 3041 as amended by Senate
Bill 230 (2015-2016 session), In re Rodriguez (1975)
14 Cal.3d 639, In re Rogers (1980) 28 Cal.3d 429, and
In re Butler, Stipulation and Order Regarding Settlement,
First Appellate District Court of California Case
No A139411, December 16, 2013; hereinafter “Butler
2013 stipulated agreement.”
5. REASONS SUPPORTING THE AGENCY’S
DECISION: Petitioner contends that the board is required
under Penal Code section 1170.2 and the Butler
2013 stipulated agreement combine to require the board
to fix maximum determinite terms for all inmates. Petitioner
further contends that, after the inmate’s term has
been “fixed,” the California Supreme Court’s decisions
in Rodriguez, supra, 14 Cal.3d 639 and Rogers, supra,
28 Cal.3d 429 mandate the board to release the inmate
once he or she reaches the end of this term, regardless of
the inmate’s suitability for parole. Based on these contentions,
Petitioner requests the board to repeal all portions
of the California Code of Regulations, Title 15,
sections 2281, 2402, 2403, 2422, 2423, 2431, 2432, and
2433 that authorize the board to indefinitely retain an
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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
inmate in prison until the inmate is deemed suitable for
parole at a parole consideration hearing before the
board.

Petitioner’s request is DENIED: Both of Petitioner’s
contentions supporting his request are based on a
misunderstanding of the application of the language
“fixing a term” under Rodriguez, supra, 14 Cal.3d 639,
Penal Code section 1170.2, Rogers, supra, 28 Cal.3d
429, and the Butler 2013 stipulated agreement. The correct
application of these laws demonstrates that the
board has no legal authority to take the actions Petitioner
requests.

As explained below in greater detail, the concepts of
“fixing a term” in the three sources Petitioner cites actually
relate to three different functions of the state’s current
and prior paroling authorities. Specifically, the California
Supreme Court’s decision in Rodriguez, supra,
14 Cal.3d 639, relates to the prior Adult Authority’s requirements
to set lower terms than the statutory indeterminate
maximum for inmates sentenced to certain
crimes prior to July 1, 1977, under California’s previous
indeterminate sentencing laws. Penal Code section
1170.2 and Rogers, supra, 28 Cal.3d 429, relate to a different
requirement to fix determinate sentences for inmates
sentenced under California’s original indeterminate
sentencing laws prior to July 1, 1977, but whose
crimes would have received a determinate sentence under
California’s post-July 1, 1977 determinate sentencing
scheme. Moreover, the Butler 2013 stipulated
agreement relates to the board’s separate requirement to
calculate, based on the unique circumstances and gravity
of the crime, the minimum term an inmate sentenced
to a life term must serve before he or she may be legally
released after the board has found the inmate suitable
for parole at a parole consideration hearing.

Legal Background on California Sentencing Laws

Before July 1, 1977, California’s sentencing laws
were based on an indeterminate sentencing scheme.
Under that scheme, penal statutes specified both a minimum
and a maximum sentence for felonies. These dates
often ranged broadly from as little as one year in prison
to imprisonment for life. During sentencing, the trial
court would impose the statutory range as the sentence,
but the actual length of a defendant’s term was determined
by the “Adult Authority,” which determined
when the inmate was suitable for parole within the minimum
and maximum sentence range. (See People v. Jefferson
(1999) 21 Cal. 4th 86, 94.)

However, on July 1, 1977, the Legislature replaced
California’s indeterminate sentencing scheme with the
Determinate Sentencing Act contained in Penal Code
section 1170. Under this new sentencing scheme, most
felonies specify three possible terms of imprisonment
(the lower, middle, and upper terms) generally referred

to as “determinate sentences.” During sentencing, the
trial court imposes one of these terms. Once imposed, a
determinate sentence establishes the maximum term for
which the inmate may be incarcerated for this crime.
Under Penal Code section 1168, however, the Legislature
made clear that some crimes remain punishable by
imprisonment for either some number of years to life, or
simply life in prison. (See Pen. Code, § 1168, subd. (b)
and Jefferson, supra, 21 Cal.4th at pp. 92-93 & fn. 2.)
In those cases, the court only imposes the statutory life
term. To be paroled, the inmate must be found suitable
for parole by a panel of board commissioners, in accordance
with Penal Code section 3041.

“Fixing a Term” Under the Prior Indeterminate
Sentencing Laws and In re Rodriguez

Before the shift from California’s Indeterminate Sentencing
Law to the Determinate Sentencing Law, a sentencing
court did not fix a specified duration of imprisonment.
Rather, the court imposed the statutory minimum
and maximum sentence range and the state’s prior
paroling authority, then called the “Adult Authority,”
was charged with determining the actual length of time
within the statutory range imposed by the court. (See
Rodriguez, supra, 14 Cal.3d at p. 646.) Under the laws
at that time, the Adult Authority had the discretion to fix
a term and set a parole date for an inmate at any time
during the statutory sentence range, depending on when
the Adult Authority deemed an inmate ready to parole.
Generally, once fixed, the inmate would be released on
the parole date; however, the Adult Authority also had
discretion to revoke that date and “refix” the term up to
the statutory maximum if it deemed that the inmate was
not ready for parole.

In the California Supreme Court’s decision in Rodriguez,
the court was concerned with the Adult Authority’s
practice, at that time, of failing to fix parole
dates at less than the statutory maximum until the inmate
had received a grant of parole. However, the
court’s ruling in this case was superseded by statute in
1977 when the Legislature enacted the Determinate
Sentencing Law because, with the exception of the
crimes that still require life terms, the statutes now provided
specific terms for the court to impose as sentences.
(Rodriguez, supra, 14 Cal.3d 639.) Additionally,
Penal Code sections 1168 and 3041 still clarify that,
for crimes that carry life sentences with the possibility
of parole, the court still does not fix a term of imprisonment.
Rather, the inmate is sentenced to a life term and
must be found suitable for parole by a panel of board
commissioners before the inmate is eligible for release.

Thus, the action of “fixing a term” by the Adult Authority,
as discussed in Rodriguez, is no longer a valid
action of the state’s current paroling authority.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
“Fixing a Term” Under Penal Code section 1170.2 and
In re Rogers

Following the shift from California’s Indeterminate
Sentencing Law to the Determinate Sentencing Law,
the Legislature determined that some inmates serving
indeterminate terms under the prior laws had committed
crimes for which the Penal Code now specified determinate
sentences only. However, because the crime
had been committed before July 1, 1977, the court was
limited to sentencing the inmate under the prior Indeterminate
Sentencing Law and imposing only the statutory
range of minimum and maximum terms.

Thus, along with the Determinate Sentencing Law
contained in Penal Code section 1170, the Legislature
simultaneously enacted Penal Code section 1170.2.
This statute required the state’s paroling authority, then
called the Community Release Board (and later the
Board of Prison Terms), to determine for these inmates
what the specified sentence length would have been if
the court had sentenced the inmate under the Determinate
Sentencing Law. If the Board of Prison Terms determined
that the current specific sentence length would
be less than the time required under the prior Indeterminate
Sentencing Law, the Board of Prison Terms was required
to establish the inmate’s parole date unless it determined,
based on certain specific evidence, that the
inmate should serve a longer term. In its decision in
Rogers, supra, 28 Cal.3d 429, the California Supreme
Court was concerned with the Community Release
Board adding extra years to a statutory determinate sentence
length when fixing a term for an inmate under Penal
Code section 1170.2.

All inmates sentenced to indeterminate sentence
ranges for crimes committed before July 1, 1977, have
had their sentences reviewed and recalculated, as appropriate.
All inmates currently incarcerated with life
terms were either (1) deemed under Penal Code section
1170.2 to have committed a crime before July 1, 1977,
that still retained a life sentence following the enactment
of the Determinate Sentencing Law or (2) properly
sentenced by the court to a life term for a crime committed
after July 1, 1977.

Therefore, unless an inmate is convicted in the future
of a crime committed before July 1, 1977, for which the
Penal Code lists no statute of limitations, the action of
“fixing a term” under Penal Code section 1170.2, as discussed
in Rogers, supra, 28 Cal.3d 429, is no longer a
valid action of the state’s current paroling authority.

“Fixing a Term” Under the Butler 2013 Stipulated
Agreement

Following the enactment of the Determinate Sentencing
Law, the state’s paroling authority, now called
the Board of Parole Hearings, only retained the jurisdiction
to determine release dates for inmates sentenced to

life sentences, in accordance with Penal Code section
3041. (This was recently expanded under other laws to
include youthful and elderly offenders with determinate
terms; however, those inmates are not subject to
term calculations as described in this section.)

To carry out the board’s requirements, the board was
mandated to complete two distinct functions. First, a
panel of board commissioners was required to meet
with a life inmate at a parole consideration hearing and
review the “the gravity of the current convicted offense
or offenses, or the timing and gravity of current or past
convicted offense or offenses.” (Pen. Code, § 3041,
subd. (b)(1).) Following the hearing, the panel was required
to determine whether the inmate was suitable for
parole, meaning the inmate no longer posed a current
unreasonable risk of danger to the public such that consideration
of the public safety requires a lengthier period
of incarceration for that inmate. (See Pen. Code,
§ 3041, subd. (b)(1); In re Lawrence (2008) 44 Cal.4th
1181; In re Shaputis (2008) 44 Cal.4th 1241; In re Shaputis
(Shaputis II) (2011) 53 Cal.4th 192.)

Second, at the inmate’s first parole consideration
hearing, the panel was also required under Penal Code
section 3041(a), as it existed at that time, to “normally
set a parole release date under Penal Code section
3041.5” that would serve as the date on which an inmate
could be released after being found suitable for parole.
(See former Pen. Code, § 3041, subd. (a) as amended by
Stats.2013, c. 312.) These parole release dates were calculated
by selecting a “base term” from a matrix of sentence
lengths based on the unique circumstances of the
crime, adjusting the base term if necessary for additional
crimes or enhancements to calculate an “adjusted
base term,” and mitigating the adjusted base term with
credits for positive institutional conduct and achievements
to calculate a final term. (See Cal. Code Regs., tit.
15, §§ 2282-2292, 2403-2411, 2422-2429.1, and
2433-2439.1.)

The purpose of calculating a final term under Penal
Code section 3041 was not to establish a fixed date of
release regardless of whether the inmate was suitable
for parole. Rather, the purpose was to establish a minimum
amount of time that the inmate would be required
to serve that would “provide uniform terms for offenses
of similar gravity and magnitude with respect to their
threat to the public.” (See former Pen. Code, § 3041,
subd. (a) as amended by Stats.2013, c. 312.) However,
inmates still had to be deemed suitable for parole by the
panel before the inmate would be eligible for release,
even after the calculated term. This means that an inmate
deemed suitable for parole after the date calculated
by the panel would be immediately eligible for release;
however, an inmate deemed suitable for parole

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
before the calculated date would still remain incarcerated
until he or she passed completed the board’s term.

In the Butler 2013 stipulated agreement, the California
Court of Appeal, First Appellate District accepted
the parties agreement under which the board agreed to
calculate the inmate’s base or adjusted base term at his
or her initial parole consideration hearing so that the inmate
could preserve a proportionality challenge to the
length of time in prison.

On January 1, 2016, the Legislature enacted Senate
Bill 230 (2015-2016 regular session), which amended
Penal Code section 3041 to remove the board’s authority
to set parole release dates. The consequence of this
statutory amendment was that inmates deemed suitable
for parole were now eligible for immediate release following
all statutory review periods, regardless of the
date on which the board would have calculated a minimum
term. However, despite the repeal of the board’s
authority to set minimum parole release dates, the Butler
court still required the board to calculate these minimum
terms in accordance with the California Code of
Regulations, Title 15, sections 2282-2292, 2403-2411,
2422-2429.1, and 2433-2439.1; these terms just no
longer have any legal effect on when an inmate is actually
eligible for release. Instead, eligibility for parole of
a life inmate is dictated solely by when the inmate is
deemed suitable for parole in accordance with Penal
Code section 3041 and the California Code of Regulations,
Title 15, sections 2281 and 2402.

Conclusion

As explained above, Petitioner’s contentions supporting
his request are based on a misunderstanding of
the application of the language “fixing a term” under
Rodriguez, supra, 14 Cal.3d 639, Penal Code section
1170.2, and the Butler 2013 stipulated agreement. The
concept of “fixing a term” relates to different functions
of the state’s current and prior paroling authorities. The
process of “fixing a term” under Rodriguez was superseded
by the Legislature’s enactment of the Determinate
Sentencing Law on July 1, 1977. The process of
“fixing a term” under Penal Code section 1170.2 and
Rogers, supra, 28 Cal.3d 429, was completed and no
longer applies unless an inmate is sentenced in the future
for crimes committed before July 1, 1977. Finally,
the process of “calculated a term” under Penal Code
section 3041, as it existed in 2015, and the Butler 2013
stipulated agreement relates to the process of calculating
minimum term lengths an inmate must serve, and
does not override the requirement that the inmate be
deemed suitable for parole before the inmate is eligible
for release.

To carry out the board’s current statutory mandates of

(1) determining a life inmate’s suitability for parole and
(2) calculating a Butler term, the board must follow the
requirements in each of the sections Petitioner has requested
the board to repeal. Consequently, the board
DENIES petitioner’s request because the board has no
lawful authority to take the actions petitioner requests.

6. BOARD CONTACT PERSON:
Heather L. McCray

Senior Staff Attorney

Board of Parole Hearings

P. O. Box 4036
Sacramento, CA 95812-4036
Office: (916) 322-6729
Fax: (916) 322-3475
BPH.Regulations@cdcr.ca.gov
7. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS: Under
subdivision (d) of Government Code section 11340.7,
the board will provide a copy of this decision to the Office
of Administrative Law for publication in the California
Regulatory Notice Register. Any interested persons
have the right to obtain a copy of the petition that is
the subject of this decision by sending a request to the
board. In submited such a request, please reference
BPH PETITION RESPONSE 2016-04 in the
request.
DATE OF DECISION: September 28, 2016

SUMMARY OF REGULATORY
ACTIONS
REGULATIONS FILED WITH
SECRETARY OF STATE
This Summary of Regulatory Actions lists regulations
filed with the Secretary of State on the dates indicated.
Copies of the regulations may be obtained by
contacting the agency or from the Secretary of State,
Archives, 1020 O Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, (916)
653-7715. Please have the agency name and the date
filed (see below) when making a request.

File# 2016-0826-08
BOARD OF BARBERING AND COSMETOLOGY
Demonstration of Products

In this regulatory rulemaking, the Board adopts section
965.1 in Title 16 of the California Code of Regulations
to define the term “demonstrating.” The definition
interprets, implements, and makes specific the exception
from licensing found in Business and Professions
Code section 7319, subdivision (e).

Title 16
ADOPT: 965.1
Filed 10/05/2016
Effective 01/01/2017
Agency Contact: Kevin Flanagan (916) 575-7104

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
File# 2016-0901-02
BUREAU OF ELECTRONIC AND APPLIANCE
REPAIR, HOME FURNISHINGS AND THERMAL
INSULATION
License Fee

This action amends the license issuance and renewal
fees with respect to home furnishings and insulation
manufacturing.

Title 4
AMEND: 1107
Filed 09/28/2016
Effective 09/28/2016
Agency Contact: Diana Godines (916) 999-2068

File# 2016-0906-01
BUREAU OF REAL ESTATE APPRAISERS
Consulting Appraisals

This rulemaking action by the Bureau of Real Estate
Appraisers (Bureau) updates three sections in title 10 of
the California Code of Regulations for consistency with
new federal requirements and to allow the Bureau to approve
practicum courses for trainee appraisers.

Title 10
AMEND: 3542, 3570, 3577
Filed 09/29/2016
Effective 09/29/2016
Agency Contact: Kyle Muteff (916) 341-6126

File# 2016-0826-01
CALIFORNIA ARCHITECTS BOARD
Architect Registration Examination (ARE) Transition

The National Council of Architectural Registration
Boards (NCARB) is the national test vendor that supplies
the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) to
the California Architects Board. NCARB developed a
new version of the ARE and a transitional credit model
for candidates. This action by the California Architects
Board amends section 118.5 and adopts section 119.8 of
title 16 of the California Code of Regulations to provide
a transition plan for candidates for licensure who were
not successful in passing all sections under the prior
ARE and who are required to transition to the new ARE.
This action also amends existing procedures to allow
candidates who transfer to California to receive credit
for passing the new ARE in another jurisdiction.

Title 16
ADOPT: 119.8 AMEND: 118.5
Filed 09/29/2016
Effective 10/01/2016
Agency Contact: Timothy Rodda (916) 575-7217

File# 2016-0926-04
CALIFORNIA HEALTH BENEFIT EXCHANGE
SHOP Eligibility and Enrollment Process

The California Health Benefit Exchange (HBEX)
submitted this emergency readoption action to maintain
the effectiveness of ten sections added to title 10 of the
California Code of Regulations in OAL file nos.
2013-0920-05E, 2014-0321-01EE, 2014-0620-
06EE, and 2014-0922-02EE. This action is a straight
across readoption of the regulations filed in OAL file
no. 2014-0922-02EE. The regulations establish criteria
and procedures for qualified employers and qualified
employees to enroll in health coverage under the
Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP), a
program that is required under both federal and state
law to implement the federal Patient and Protection and
Affordable Care Act. The regulations establish HBEX
policies and procedures for eligibility determination
and redetermination, enrollment in qualified health
plans, effective dates of coverage, and termination of
coverage through the SHOP.

Title 10

ADOPT: 6520, 6522, 6524, 6526, 6528, 6530, 6532,

6534, 6536, 6538

Filed 09/30/2016

Effective 09/30/2016

Agency Contact:

Gabriela Ventura Gonzales (916) 228-8477

File# 2016-0926-05
CALIFORNIA HEALTH BENEFIT EXCHANGE
Eligibility and Enrollment Process for the Individual
Exchange

This emergency action was submitted for a ninth re-
adopt of the regulations pursuant to Government Code
section 100504(a)(6). These regulations establish the
Health Benefit Exchange’s policies and procedures for
eligibility determination and redetermination, enrollment
in qualified health plans, and termination of coverage
through the Exchange in the individual Market.

Title 10
ADOPT: 6408, 6410, 6450, 6452, 6454, 6470, 6472,
6474, 6476, 6478, 6480, 6482, 6484, 6486, 6490,
6492, 6494, 6496, 6498, 6500, 6502, 6504, 6506,
6508, 6510, 6600, 6602, 6604, 6606, 6608, 6610,
6612, 6614, 6616, 6618, 6620, 6622
Filed 09/30/2016
Effective 09/30/2016
Agency Contact: Bahara Hosseini (916) 228-8486

File# 2016-0927-01
DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
Asian Citrus Psyllid Interior Quarantine

This emergency regulatory action by the Department
of Food and Agriculture expands the quarantine area for

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
the Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri by approximately
14 square miles in the Arvin area of Kern
County. The amendment provides authority for the state
to perform quarantine activities against ACP within this
additional area.

Title 3
AMEND: 3435(b)
Filed 09/30/2016
Effective 09/30/2016
Agency Contact: Sara Khalid (916) 403-6625

File# 2016-0926-01
DEPARTMENT OF RESOURCES RECYCLING
AND RECOVERY
Glass Container Processing Operations

The Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery
is adoping one section and amending three sections
in title 14 of the California Code of Regulations in this
emergency action. This action allows glass processors
to receive a streamlined permit instead of a full solid
waste facility permit for their facilities. Currently glass
processors in California are receiving enough waste
mixed in with the glass they receive to require a full solid
waste facility permit.

Title 14
ADOPT: 17403.3.1 AMEND: 17402, 17403.0,
17405.0
Filed 10/04/2016
Effective 10/04/2016
Agency Contact: Harllee Branch (916) 341-6056

File# 2016-0818-05
DEPARTMENT OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES
CONTROL
California Brake Friction Material Requirements

This action adopts (1) performance requirements for
testing and chemical compliance of brake friction materials;
(2) marking requirements for brake friction materials;
(3) certification procedures used by testing certification
agencies; (4) approval standards for alternative
chemical testing methods for brake friction materials;

(5) approval standards for alternative laboratory accreditation;
and (6) an application process for extensions
of time to comply.
Title 22
ADOPT: 66387.1, 66387.2, 66387.3, 66387.4,
66387.5, 66387.6, 66387.7, 66387.8, 66387.9
Filed 09/30/2016
Effective 01/01/2017
Agency Contact: Suzanne Davis (916) 327-4206

File# 2016-0927-03
OFFICE OF SPILL PREVENTION AND RESPONSE
Statewide Oil Spill Response Organizations (OSRO)
Ratings

This emergency readopt file and print action by the
Office of Spill Prevention and Response amends eight
sections in title 14 of the California Code of Regulations
(CCR) to implement changes to the statewide oil spill
prevention and response program pursuant to Senate
Bill 861 (Stats. 2014, ch. 931). This is a statutorily
deemed emergency and exempt from review by the Office
of Administrative Law, pursuant to Government
Code section 8670.7.5.

Title 14
AMEND: 819, 819.01, 819.02, 819.03, 819.04,
819.05, 819.06, 819.07
Filed 10/04/2016
Effective 10/04/2016
Agency Contact: Christine Kluge (916) 327-0910

File# 2016-0819-04
VICTIM COMPENSATION BOARD
CalVCP Program Regulation

This rulemaking action by the California Victim
Compensation Board (CalVCB) amends and repeals
certain sections, and adopts one new section, in Title 2
of the California Code of Regulations concerning financial
assistance to victims and derivative victims of
crimes. More specifically, the action conforms
CalVCB’s regulations to changes made to law by Assembly
Bill 1140, Chapter 569, Statutes of 2015 and
Senate Bill 836, Chapter 31, Statutes of 2016, regarding,
for example, the elimination of the eligibility exemption
for “participation” in a crime and the need to
more specifically define “involvement” in a crime for
purposes of exemption from eligibility. The action
adopts new provisions regarding what evidence, other
than crime reports, may be considered when determining
whether an individual was the victim of a sexual assault
crime. In addition, the action amends certain provisions
concerning available benefits to reflect
CalVCB’s improved financial condition.

Title 2
ADOPT: 649.49 AMEND: 649, 649.3, 649.4,
649.18, 649.50, 649.52, 649.57, 649.60 REPEAL:
649.1, 649.46, 649.51, 649.62
Filed 10/03/2016
Effective 01/01/2017
Agency Contact: Tanya Bosch (916) 491-3851

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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
CCR CHANGES FILED
WITH THE SECRETARY OF STATE
WITHIN May 4, 2016 TO
October 5, 2016
All regulatory actions filed by OAL during this period
are listed below by California Code of Regulations
titles, then by date filed with the Secretary of State, with
the Manual of Policies and Procedures changes adopted
by the Department of Social Services listed last. For further
information on a particular file, contact the person
listed in the Summary of Regulatory Actions section of
the Notice Register published on the first Friday more
than nine days after the date filed.

Title 2

10/03/16
ADOPT: 649.49 AMEND: 649, 649.3,
649.4, 649.18, 649.50, 649.52, 649.57,

649.60 REPEAL: 649.1, 649.46, 649.51,
649.62
09/19/16 ADOPT: 18751 REPEAL: 18751
09/19/16 AMEND: 18215.3, 18232
09/15/16 AMEND: 18942
09/13/16 AMEND: 1181.2, 1181.3, 1181.6,
1183.1, 1183.2, 1183.3, 1183.8, 1183.9,
1183.10, 1183.11, 1183.14, 1183.15,
1183.17, 1183.18, 1185.1, 1185.2,
1185.3, 1185.4, 1185.5, 1187.4, 1187.6,
1187.7, 1187.8, 1187.9, 1187.14,
1187.15, 1190.1, 1190.2, 1190.3, 1190.5

09/07/16
ADOPT: 3000, 3001, 3002, 3003, 3004,
3005, 3006, 3007, 3008, 3009, 3010,
3011, 3012, 3013, 3014, 3015, 3016

08/31/16 AMEND: 18531.5
08/17/16 AMEND: 18239
08/17/16 AMEND: 59000
07/29/16 ADOPT: 599.860
07/13/16 AMEND: 1859.2, 1859.102 REPEAL:

1866, 1866.1, 1866.2, 1866.3, 1866.4,
1866.4.1, 1866.4.2, 1866.4.3, 1866.4.4,
1866.4.6, 1866.4.7, 1866.5, 1866.5.1,
1866.5.2, 1866.5.3, 1866.5.4, 1866.5.5,
1866.5.6, 1866.5.7, 1866.5.8, 1866.5.9,
1866.7, 1866.8, 1866.9, 1866.9.1,
1866.10, 1866.12, 1866.13, 1866.14

07/11/16 AMEND: 59560
06/27/16 AMEND: 1897
06/23/16 ADOPT: 17010, 17011, 17012, 17013,

17014, 17030, 17031, 17032, 17033,
17034, 17035, 17036, 17037, 17038,
17039, 17040, 17041, 17042, 17043,
17044, 17045, 17046, 17047 REPEAL:
17010, 17030, 17111, 17112, 17113,
17120, 17121, 17122, 17130, 17140,
17141, 17142, 17150, 17151, 17152,

05/25/16
05/23/16
05/19/16

Title 3
09/30/16
09/27/16
09/27/16
09/21/16

09/20/16
09/20/16
09/16/16
09/14/16
09/07/16
09/07/16

08/29/16
08/29/16
08/29/16
08/26/16
08/25/16
08/24/16
08/24/16

17153, 17160, 17200, 17201, 17210,
17220, 17300, 17400, 17402, 17403,
17404, 17405, 17406, 17408, 17412,
17414, 17416, 17418, 17420, 17422,
17424, 17426, 17430, 17432, 17434,
17435, 17436, 17440, 17442, 17444,
17446, 17448, 17450, 17452, 17454,
17458, 17460, 17461, 17463, 17464,
17466, 17468, 17470, 17471, 17473,
17475, 17477, 17478, 17481, 17482,
17483, 17485, 17486, 17488, 17490,
17491, 17493, 17495, 17498, 17500,
17502, 17504, 17508, 17510, 17512,
17514, 17515, 17516, 17518, 17519,
17520, 17521, 17525, 17527, 17528,
17530, 17532, 17534, 17538, 17542,
17544, 17546, 17548, 17550, 17551,
17552, 17553, 17554, 17555, 17556,
17557, 17558, 17559, 17560, 17561,
17562, 17563, 17564, 17565, 17566,
17567, 17570, 17571, 17572, 17575,
17576, 17580, 17581, 17582, 17588,
17590, 17592
AMEND: 604
AMEND: 23000
ADOPT: 18750 REPEAL: 18750,
18750.1, 18750.2, 18752
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 4603, 3883 REPEAL: 3885
ADOPT: 302, 303, 304, 304.1, 304.2,
305, 305.1, 305.2, 305.3, 306, 306.1,
306.2, 306.3, 307, 308, 309, 310, 310.1,
311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316.1, 316.2,
316.3, 316.4, 317, 318, 319, 320.1, 320.2,
320.3, 321, 322, 322.1, 322.2, 322.3, 323,
323.1, 323.2, 324.1, 324.2, 325, 326, 327,
328, 329, 330.1, 330.2, 340
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 3435(b)
ADOPT: 3442
ADOPT: 3000, 3001, 3002, 3003, 3004,
3005, 3006, 3007, 3008, 3009, 3010,
3011, 3012, 3013, 3014, 3015, 3016
ADOPT: 3591.26
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 3591.2
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 3435(b)
AMEND: 1358.7
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CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
08/23/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
08/03/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
08/02/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
08/01/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
08/01/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
07/25/16 AMEND: 3024.5
07/25/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
07/25/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
07/25/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
07/21/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
07/20/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
07/07/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
07/05/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
07/05/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/30/16 ADOPT: 450, 450.1, 450.2, 450.3, 450.4,
451, 452
06/30/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/30/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/28/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/22/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/22/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/20/16 AMEND: 3591.12
06/16/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/13/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/13/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/08/16 AMEND: 850
06/06/16 ADOPT: 1358.7
06/02/16 AMEND: 3439(b)
06/02/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
06/01/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
05/25/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
05/23/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
05/18/16 AMEND: 3435
05/17/16 AMEND: 3906
05/12/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
05/12/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
05/11/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
05/11/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
05/10/16 AMEND: 3435(b)
05/09/16 ADOPT: 3591.27
Title 4
09/28/16 AMEND: 1107
09/28/16 AMEND: 1007
09/15/16 ADOPT: 424, 425, 426, 830, 831, 832,
833, 834, 835, 836 AMEND: 201.5, 303
09/13/16 ADOPT: 1489.2
08/29/16 ADOPT: 8078.8, 8078.9, 8078.10,
8078.11, 8078.12, 8078.13, 8078.14
08/09/16 AMEND: 10031, 10032, 10033, 10035,
10036
07/25/16 AMEND: 1581, 1843
07/19/16 AMEND: 5170
07/19/16 ADOPT: 1866.1 AMEND: 1844
07/05/16 AMEND: 1689.1

06/29/16
06/15/16
06/14/16

Title 5

09/22/16

08/30/16
08/26/16
08/16/16
08/03/16
07/27/16
07/20/16

07/14/16
07/05/16

06/15/16

05/31/16
05/31/16

05/31/16

05/18/16

Title 8
09/20/16
08/02/16

07/28/16

06/28/16
05/18/16

Title 9

09/16/16

06/27/16
06/06/16

05/31/16

AMEND: 8034, 8035
ADOPT: 299 AMEND: 297, 300
AMEND: 5000, 5033, 5052, 5144, 5205,
5220, 5221, 5230
ADOPT: 11533, 11534 AMEND: 11530,
11531
ADOPT: 1700
AMEND: 27000, 27004
ADOPT: 80022 AMEND: 80025.3
AMEND: 19810
AMEND: 19810
AMEND: 30950, 30951, 30951.1,
30952, 30953, 30954, 30955, 30956,
30957, 30958, 30959
ADOPT: 74117 AMEND: 74110, 74112
REPEAL: 6100, 6101, 6102, 6103, 6104,
6105, 6110, 6111, 6112, 6113, 6115,
6116, 6120, 6125, 6126
REPEAL: 3820, 3822, 3823, 3824, 3831,
3840, 3860, 3870
REPEAL: 9517.1, 9531, 9532, 9535
ADOPT: 11533, 11534 AMEND: 11530,
11531
ADOPT: 11524, 11525 AMEND: 11520,
11521, 11522
ADOPT: 851.5, 853.6, 853.8, 860
AMEND: 850, 851, 853, 853.5, 853.7,
855, 857, 858, 859, 861, 862, 862.5, 863,
864
AMEND: 334
ADOPT: 346, 346.1, 346.2, 350.3, 350.4,
355.1, 355.2, 355.3, 355.4, 355.5, 372.8,
372.9, 376.8 AMEND: 347, 348, 352,
354, 356, 356.1, 356.2, 359, 359.1, 361.3,
364.2, 371, 371.1, 371.2, 372.6, 376.1,
376.4, 376.7, 378, 380, 383, 391.1, 392,
392.4, 392.5 REPEAL: 355
ADOPT: 9792.24.4 AMEND: 9792.23,
9792.24.2
AMEND: 5148(c)
AMEND: 362, 364, 364.1
ADOPT: 4700, 4710, 4711, 4712, 4713,
4714, 4715, 4716, 4717
ADOPT: 4600, 4601, 4602
AMEND: 811, 812, 823, 836.2, 862, 865,
865.4, 865.5
ADOPT: 7006.5 AMEND: 7019.1, 7020,
7024, 7029.9, 7054, 7055, 7060, 7062,
7062.3, 7122, 7143, 7157, 7164, 7164.4,
1882

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
7194, 7198 REPEAL: 7004.3, 7019.2, 7022,
7029.3
05/12/16 AMEND: 7140, 7142, 7142.5, 7143.5,
7164.6, 7196, 7211, 7290, 7353.6

Title 10
09/30/16 ADOPT: 6520, 6522, 6524, 6526, 6528,
6530, 6532, 6534, 6536, 6538
09/30/16 ADOPT: 6408, 6410, 6450, 6452, 6454,
6470, 6472, 6474, 6476, 6478, 6480,
6482, 6484, 6486, 6490, 6492, 6494,
6496, 6498, 6500, 6502, 6504, 6506,
6508, 6510, 6600, 6602, 6604, 6606,
6608, 6610, 6612, 6614, 6616, 6618,
6620, 6622
09/29/16 AMEND: 3542, 3570, 3577
09/27/16 AMEND: 3543
09/01/16 ADOPT: 6864
08/29/16 AMEND: 3568
08/29/16 AMEND: 3569
08/10/16 AMEND: 250.30 REPEAL: 5.2000,
5.2001
08/09/16 AMEND: 2498.6
08/09/16 AMEND: 2498.4.9
08/09/16 AMEND: 2498.6
08/09/16 AMEND: 2498.4.9, 2498.6
08/08/16 AMEND: 2498.5
07/11/16 AMEND: 2053, 2053.1, 2054, 2054.1,
2054.2, 2054.3, 2054.5, 2054.6, 2054.7,
2055, 2056, 2057, 2058, 2059, 2061,
2061.1, 2061.2, 2061.3, 2061.4, 2061.5,
2062, 2062.1, 2062.2, 2063, 2063.1,
2063.2, 2063.3, 2064, 2065, 2066,
2066.1, 2066.2, 2066.3, 2066.4, 2066.5,
2067, 2068, 2069, 2070, 2071, 2072,
2073, 2074, 2075, 2076, 2077, 2077.1,
2078, 2079, 2079.1, 2080, 2081, 2082,
2083, 2083.1, 2084, 2086, 2087, 2088,
2088.1, 2088.2, 2088.3, 2089, 2090,
2091, 2092, 2094, 2094.1, 2094.2, 2095,
2096, 2097, 2098, 2099, 2100, 2101,
2101.1, 2101.2, 2101.3, 2102, 2103,
2104 REPEAL: 2054.4, 2060
06/14/16 ADOPT: 6540, 6542, 6544, 6546, 6548,
6550, 6552
06/07/16 ADOPT: 8100, 8110, 8120, 8130, 8140,
8150
06/06/16 ADOPT: 6408, 6410, 6450, 6452, 6454,
6470, 6472, 6474, 6476, 6478, 6480,
6482, 6484, 6486, 6490, 6492, 6494,
6496, 6498, 6500, 6502, 6504, 6506,
6508, 6510, 6600, 6602, 6604, 6606,
6608, 6610, 6612, 6614, 6616, 6618,
6620, 6622

05/31/16 AMEND: 2500, 2501, 2503, 2504, 2505,
2507.1, 2507.2, 2508 REPEAL: 2502
05/26/16 ADOPT: 6858
05/23/16 ADOPT: 6700, 6702, 6704, 6706, 6708,
6710, 6712, 6714, 6716, 6718
05/11/16 ADOPT: 5508, 5509, 5510, 5511, 5512,
5513, 5514, 5515, 5516
05/10/16 AMEND: 2318.6, 2353.1, 2354
05/10/16 AMEND: 2353.1
Title 11
09/22/16 AMEND: 1001, 1052, 1053
09/08/16 AMEND: 1001, 1014, 1015, 1055
08/30/16 ADOPT: 3205 AMEND: 3000, 3001,
3003, 3201, 3203, 3204
08/02/16 AMEND: 1003, 1055, 1081, 1950, 1959
07/28/16 AMEND: 1005, 1007, 1008
07/08/16 AMEND: 310, 312, 999.1
06/22/16 AMEND: 1004, 1011
06/09/16 AMEND: 1005, 1007, 1008, 1009, 1010,
1011, 1054, 1058, 1070, 1081, 1082,
1084, 1960
06/01/16 AMEND: 51.22
Title 12
08/31/16 AMEND: 452, 453
08/30/16 ADOPT: 463, 464 AMEND: 461
06/17/16 ADOPT: 509
05/23/16 ADOPT: 462
Title 13
09/20/16 ADOPT: 222.00, 222.02
09/01/16 AMEND: 550
08/23/16 AMEND: 1606, 16.08, Appendix
07/25/16 AMEND: 1202.1, 1202.2, 1232
07/25/16 AMEND: 1900, 1956.8, 1968.2, 1968.5,
1971.1, 1971.5, 2485, 95302, 95662
07/07/16 AMEND: 15.01
06/23/16 ADOPT: 15.08 AMEND: 15.07
06/23/16 AMEND: 268.10
05/09/16 AMEND: 156.00, 156.01
Title 14
10/04/16 ADOPT: 17403.3.1 AMEND: 17402,
17403.0, 17405.0
10/04/16 AMEND: 819, 819.01, 819.02, 819.03,
819.04, 819.05, 819.06, 819.07
09/27/16 AMEND: Appendix G
09/22/16 AMEND: 18660.40
09/13/16 ADOPT: 250.2
09/08/16 AMEND: 913.4, 933.4
09/01/16 ADOPT: 820.02
09/01/16 ADOPT: 798 AMEND: 791, 791.6,
791.7, 792, 793, 794, 795, 796, 797
09/01/16 ADOPT: 817.04 AMEND: 790
08/30/16 AMEND: 699.5

1883

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
08/15/16 ADOPT: 1666.0, 1666.1, 1666.2, 1666.3,
1666.4, 1666.5, 1666.6, 1666.7, 1666.8,
1666.9, 1666.10, 1666.11, 1666.12,
1666.13, 1666.14, 1666.15, 1666.16
AMEND: 1665.2 REPEAL: 1665.8
08/03/16 AMEND: 29.85
08/01/16 ADOPT: 131
08/01/16 AMEND: 1724.9
07/27/16 ADOPT: 708.18 AMEND: 265, 353, 360,
361, 362, 363, 364, 364.1
07/27/16 ADOPT: 708.18 AMEND: 265, 353, 360,
361, 362, 363, 364, 364.1
07/25/16 AMEND: 13055
07/18/16 AMEND: 1038
07/07/16 AMEND: 1120 REPEAL: 1121
06/30/16 AMEND: 190, 195
06/30/16 AMEND: 18660.23, 18660.24,
18660.25, 18660.33, 18660.34
06/23/16 AMEND: 502, 507
06/16/16 AMEND: 120.7
06/15/16 ADOPT: 8.01
06/09/16 AMEND: 7.50
05/25/16 AMEND: 1670
05/11/16 AMEND: 17852
Title 15
09/06/16 ADOPT: 3040.2 AMEND: 3000, 3040.1,
3041, 3041.3, 3043.6, 3379
08/17/16 AMEND: 3000, 3306, 3323
08/11/16 AMEND: 3375.1, 3377
07/13/16 AMEND: 8000, 8001, 8100, 8901
06/29/16 AMEND: 3000, 3054, 3054.1, 3054.2,
3054.3, 3054.4, 3054.5
06/21/16 ADOPT: 3359.8
06/02/16 AMEND: 3000, 3084.7, 3312, 3313,
3314, 3315, 3316, 3317, 3317.1, 3317.2,
3320, 3322, 3326, 3340, 3341.3, 3376,
3378.6
05/24/16 ADOPT: 3317.1, 3317.2 AMEND: 3310,
3315, 3317
05/11/16 AMEND: 3000, 3213
05/10/16 AMEND: 3173.2
Title 16
10/05/16 ADOPT: 965.1
09/29/16 ADOPT: 119.8 AMEND: 118.5
09/27/16 AMEND: 1313.4
09/19/16 AMEND: 1399.621
09/15/16 AMEND: 1004
09/14/16 AMEND: 1399.523
09/13/16 ADOPT: 1751.8, 1751.9, 1751.10, 1752,
1753, 1754 AMEND: 1735, 1735.1,
1735.2, 1735.3, 1735.4, 1735.5, 1735.6,
1735.7, 1735.8, 1751, 1751.1, 1751.2,
1751.3, 1751.4, 1751.5, 1751.6, 1751.7,
1751.8

09/13/16
09/12/16

09/07/16
09/01/16
08/30/16
08/25/16
08/23/16
08/22/16
08/22/16
08/15/16
08/10/16
08/03/16

08/01/16

07/28/16

07/19/16
07/12/16
07/12/16
06/22/16
06/16/16
06/07/16
06/07/16

06/07/16
05/26/16
05/13/16
05/10/16
05/04/16

Title 17
08/11/16
07/25/16
07/01/16
07/01/16
05/25/16
05/24/16

Title 18
09/15/16
08/31/16
08/16/16
08/02/16
07/27/16
07/27/16
06/28/16
06/21/16

Title 19

06/30/16

AMEND: 2620
ADOPT: 635.1 AMEND: 631, 631.1,
633, 635
ADOPT: 1328.1
AMEND: 1399.696
REPEAL: 1054, 1054.1, 1054.2
ADOPT: 1746.4
AMEND: 2043
AMEND: 1023.16
AMEND: 1495.1
AMEND: 4110
ADOPT: 1730.2
AMEND: 1397.12 (renumbered to
section 1395.2)
ADOPT: 2071.1, 2087, 2087.1, 2087.2,
2087.3 AMEND: 2034, 2035, 2036.5
ADOPT: 3395.5 AMEND: 3340.1,
3340.10, 3340.28, 3395.4
AMEND: 1355.35
AMEND: 36.1
ADOPT: 1399.469.3
AMEND: 438
AMEND: 109
ADOPT: 1100
ADOPT: 1101, 1121, 1122, 1124, 1126,
1127, 1133
ADOPT: 1104, 1104.1, 1104.2
ADOPT: 1815.5
AMEND: 910
AMEND: 2403
AMEND: 4170

AMEND: 6901, 6902, 6903
ADOPT: 51000, 51001, 51002
AMEND: 6540
AMEND: 6508
AMEND: 1050
AMEND: 2500, 2502, 2505

AMEND: 25136-2
AMEND: 1597
AMEND: 1590
AMEND: 17000.30
ADOPT: 4076
AMEND: 1506
AMEND: 1698, 4901
AMEND: 1432

AMEND: 1980.00, 1980.02, 1980.04,
1980.05, 1980.06 1990.00, 1990.01,
1990.02, 1990.03, 1990.04, 1990.05,
1990.06, 1990.07, 1990.08, 1990.11,
1990.12

1884

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
06/20/16 ADOPT: 2700, 2701, 2702, 2703, 2704,
2705, 2706, 2707, 2708, 2709, 2710
05/11/16 ADOPT: 2621, 2622, 2630, 2631, 2632,
2640, 2642, 2643, 2644, 2645, 2646,
2647, 2648, 2651, 2652, 2653, 2654,
2655, 2656, 2657, 2658, 2659, 2670,
2671 AMEND: 2650 renumbered to
2621, 2660 renumbered to 2622, 2701
renumbered to 2630, 2703 renumbered to
2631, 2705 renumbered to 2632, 2720
amended and renumbered to 2640, 2722
renumbered to 2642, 2723 amended and
renumbered to 2643, 2724 renumbered to
2644, 2725 amended and renumbered to
2645, 2726 renumbered to 2646, 2727
renumbered to 2647, 2728 renumbered to
2648, 2729 amended and renumbered to
2650, 2729.1 amended and renumbered
to 2651, 2729.2 amended and
renumbered to 2652, 2729.3 amended
and renumbered to 2653, 2729.4
amended and renumbered to 2654,
2729.5 amended and renumbered to
2655, 2729.6 amended and renumbered
to 2656, 2729.7 amended and
renumbered to 2657, 2731 renumbered to
2658, 2732 amended and renumbered to
2659, 2733 amended and renumbered to
2670, 2734 renumbered to 2671
Title 20
06/30/16 AMEND: 1601, 1602, 1604, 1605.1,
1605.2, 1605.3, 1606, 1607
Title 21
07/26/16 ADOPT: 1475, 1476, 1478, 1479, 1480,
1481, 1482, 1483, 1484, 1485, 1486,
1487, 1488, 1489, 1490, 1491
05/09/16 ADOPT: 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138,
141, 151, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 171
AMEND: 111, 112, 113, 114, 121, 131,
133 (renumbered to 132) REPEAL: 132,
134, 135, 136, 141, 151, 152, 153
Title 22
09/30/16 ADOPT: 66387.1, 66387.2, 66387.3,
66387.4, 66387.5, 66387.6, 66387.7,
66387.8, 66387.9
09/16/16 AMEND: 97174
09/12/16 ADOPT: 66273.80, 66273.81, 66273.82,
66273.83, 66273.84, 66273.90,
66273.91, 66273.100, 66273.101
AMEND: 66261.4, 66273.6, 66273.7,
66273.9, 66273.70, 66273.72, 66273.73,
66273.74, 66273.75
08/31/16 REPEAL: 100031, 100032, 100033,
100034, 100035, 100036, 100037,

100038,
100039, 100040, 100041,

100042
08/01/16 AMEND: 51516.1
07/20/16 AMEND: 97212, 97215, 97225, 97226,

97227, 97228, 97229, 97248, 97252,
97258, 97259, 97260, 97264 REPEAL:
97261

06/28/16 REPEAL: 75047
06/20/16 AMEND: 51179.7
06/09/16 ADOPT: 69600.1, 69600.2, 69600.3,

69600.4, 69600.5, 69600.6, 69600.7
06/08/16 AMEND: 7000
Title 22, MPP
08/17/16 AMEND: 86500, 86501, 86501.5,
86505.1, 86506, 86522, 86524, 86528,
86561, 86565, 86565.5, 86568.1,
86568.2, 86568.4, 86570, 86575, 86577,
86580, 86587, 86587.1
07/07/16 AMEND: 83074, 83087, 84074, 84087,
86074, 86087, 86574, 86587, 89374,
89387

Title 23

08/17/16
ADOPT: 3939.50

08/15/16
ADOPT: 350, 350.2, 350.4, 351, 352,
352.2, 352.4, 352.6, 353, 353.2, 353.4,
353.6, 353.8, 353.10, 354, 354.2, 354.4,
354.6, 354.8, 354.10, 354.12, 354.14,
354.16, 354.18, 354.20, 354.22, 354.24,
354.26, 354.28, 354.30, 354.32, 354.34,
354.36, 354.38, 354.40, 354.42, 354.44,
355, 355.2, 355.4, 355.6, 355.8, 355.10,
356, 356.2, 356.4, 357, 357.2, 357.4, 358,
358.2, 358.4

07/18/16 AMEND: 2922
07/18/16 ADOPT: 3909.2
07/18/16 ADOPT: 3909.4
07/14/16 ADOPT: 3909.3
07/12/16 ADOPT: 3929.14
07/11/16 AMEND: 3939.19
06/02/16 ADOPT: 3919.16
05/31/16 ADOPT: 863, 864, 864.5, 865, 866
05/17/16 ADOPT: 3991.1 REPEAL: 3989
05/04/16 AMEND: 3935, 3936, 3939.13
Title 25
07/28/16 ADOPT: 7062.5, 7065.5 AMEND: 7065
07/05/16 ADOPT: 6924, 6932 REPEAL: 6924,
6932

Title 27

09/08/16
AMEND: 27001

08/30/16
ADOPT: 25600, 25600.1, 25600.2,
25601, 25602, 25603, 25604, 25605,
25606, 25607, 25607.1, 25607.2,
25607.3, 25607.4, 25607.5, 25607.6,
25607.7, 25607.8, 25607.9, 25607.10,

1885

CALIFORNIA REGULATORY NOTICE REGISTER 2016, VOLUME NO. 42-Z
25607.11, 25607.12, 25607.13,
25607.14, 25607.15, 25607.16,
25607.17, 25607.18, 25607.19,
25607.20, 25607.21, 25607.22,
25607.23, 25607.24, 25607.25,
25607.26, 25607.27, 25607.28,
25607.29, 25607.30, 25607.31 AMEND:
25603.3(f) (renumbered to Section
25607.30), 25603.3(g) (renumbered to
Section 25607.31) REPEAL: 25601,
25602, 25603, 25603.1, 25603.2, 25604,
25604.1, 25604.2, 25605, 25605.1,
25605.2
08/10/16 AMEND: 27001
08/09/16 AMEND: 27001
07/28/16 AMEND: 27001
07/27/16 AMEND: 25805
06/27/16 AMEND: 27001

06/22/16
06/13/16
06/13/16
05/09/16

Title MPP

08/16/16

08/01/16

07/19/16
06/13/16

AMEND: 27001
AMEND: 27001
AMEND: 25805
AMEND: 10052
ADOPT: 31-136 AMEND: 31-001,
31-002, 31-003, 31-005, 31-040,
31-066, 31-075, 31-101, 31-105,
31-110, 31-115, 31-120, 31-125,
31-135, 31-201, 31-205, 31-206,
31-310, 31-315, 31-335, 31-405,
31-406, 31-410, 31-420, 31-425,
31-430, 31-445, 31-510 REPEAL:
31-515, 31-520
ADOPT: 42-749 AMEND: 41-440,
42-711, 42-716, 44-207
AMEND: 30-754.2
ADOPT: 30-754 AMEND: 30-701
1886